HomeNewsBriefKidnapping Drops 42% in Guatemala in 3 Years: NGO
BRIEF

Kidnapping Drops 42% in Guatemala in 3 Years: NGO

GUATEMALA / 23 APR 2012 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

Kidnapping in Guatemala dropped some 42 percent between 2008 and 2011 by the count of one NGO, which may be due to the increased number of cases being brought to trial instead of languishing in the court system.

According to Grupo de Apoyo Mutuo (GAM), Guatemala saw 213 kidnappings in 2008. The total dropped steadily over the following four years, falling to 126 cases in 2011.

EFE reports that these figures are similar to those kept by Guatemala's National Police, who had slightly different totals for 2009 and 2010, but otherwise agreed with GAM's statistics.

InSight Crime Analysis

One reason for the decline in kidnappings could be the number of successfully prosecuted cases. According to EFE, the NGO found that of the 330 suspects arrested on kidnapping charges since 2008, 247 have been sentenced.

This is high compared to a crime like femicide, for which just 28 cases resulted in sentencing in 2010. Guatemala sees many more victims of femicide rather than kidnapping, with some 608 female murder victims registered in 2010, according to Guatemala's forensic science institue.

More cases overall are coming to trial and resulting in sentences in Guatemala, according to a recent study presented to the Supreme Court, reports Siglo 21. In the past two years, sentencing has increased 21.7 percent compared to 2008-2009.

But the statistics kept by the Guatemala police and by GAM may not be entirely reliable, as not all kidnappings are reported. This is especially true when the victims are Central American migrants who travel through Guatemala en route to the US, although most migrant kidnappings appear to be concentrated in Mexico. Other kidnappings in Guatemala have reportedly been carried out by current and former police officers, which could result in lower counts by the police.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

GUATEMALA / 7 FEB 2022

In this run-down neighborhood in Guatemala City, the Mara Salvatrucha (MS13) does not exist. And yet, there are still a…

CRIMINAL MIGRATION / 19 JUL 2022

Amid El Salvador's brutal anti-gang crackdown, one top MS13 leader was escorted out of the country by a government official.

ELITES AND CRIME / 28 APR 2021

US sanctions on two Guatemalan politicians -- one a political operator and the other an influential legislator -- are the…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Europe Coverage Makes a Splash

20 JAN 2023

Last week, InSight Crime published an analysis of the role of Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport as an arrival hub for cocaine and methamphetamine from Mexico.  The article was picked up by…

THE ORGANIZATION

World Looks to InSight Crime for Mexico Expertise

13 JAN 2023

Our coverage of the arrest of Chapitos’ co-founder Ovidio Guzmán López in Mexico has received worldwide attention.In the UK, outlets including The Independent and BBC…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Shares Expertise with US State Department

16 DEC 2022

Last week, InSight Crime Co-founder Steven Dudley took part in the International Anti-Corruption Conference organized by the US State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, & Labor and…

THE ORGANIZATION

Immediate Response to US-Mexico Marijuana Investigation

9 DEC 2022

InSight Crime’s investigation into how the legalization of marijuana in many US states has changed Mexico’s criminal dynamics made a splash this week appearing on the front page of…

THE ORGANIZATION

‘Ndrangheta Investigation, Exclusive Interview With Suriname President Make Waves

2 DEC 2022

Two weeks ago, InSight Crime published an investigation into how Italian mafia clan the ‘Ndrangheta built a cocaine trafficking network from South America to ‘Ndrangheta-controlled Italian ports. The investigation generated…