HomeMexicoEdgardo Leyva Escandon, alias '24'
MEXICO

Edgardo Leyva Escandon, alias '24'

ALIAS 24 / LATEST UPDATE 2017-03-09 EN

Edgardo Leyva Escandon, alias "24," has worked with Mexico's Tijuana Cartel, also known as the Arellano Felix Organization (AFO), since 1994, and is a specialist in arms and security. The United States has been seeking his capture since at least 2009.

History

Edgardo Levya Escandon, alias "24," began working with the Tijuana Cartel as an enforcer in 1994. US officials have alleged he was the group's main ammunition and firearms supplier. He has been on the run since the capture of the Tijuana Cartel's leader, Javier Arellano Feliz, in 2006.

24 Factbox

DOB: September 17, 1969

Group: Tijuana Cartel

Criminal Activities: Assassination, arms trafficking

Status: At large

Area of Operation: Tijuana, Mexico

Criminal Activities

According to the United States government, 24 has worked as a sniper, contract killer and arms supplier for the Tijuana Cartel.

Geography

The Tijuana Cartel primarily operates in the city of Tijuana along the US/Mexico border, using its location to smuggle drugs into Southern California.

Allies and Enemies

While the Tijuana Cartel is suspected of having a truce with the Sinaloa Cartel, reports have suggested the two groups may now be at odds.

Prospects

24 is wanted by both the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and Explosives and the Drug Enforcement Administration. In October 2009, his assests were frozen under the Kingpin Act, and the US Department of State has offered a $2 million reward for information leading to his arrest.

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