HomeNewsAnalysisMining Massacre Signals ELN Expansion Into Venezuela
ANALYSIS

Mining Massacre Signals ELN Expansion Into Venezuela

ELN / 19 OCT 2018 BY VENEZUELA INVESTIGATIVE UNIT EN

The recent massacre of seven people in one of Venezuela’s mining regions may confirm that the Colombia guerrilla group ELN is expanding its criminal activities into the south of Venezuela, encroaching on the gold mining territory of local mafias.

On October 14 on the border with Guyana, alleged members of the National Liberation Army (Ejército de Liberación Nacional – ELN) are believed to have ambushed a group of miners in the town of El Bochinche, located in the municipality of Sifontes in Bolívar state.

The first reports came from six miners who survived the attack. Only later did Venezuelan armed forces discover seven bodies near the mine, according to media outlet El Pitazo.

All of the victims whose bodies were recovered had been shot execution-style.  Local residents reported 16 disappearances.

So far, the Venezuelan government has not offered an official version of events.

There have been repeated massacres in the mining areas of Bolívar state, mostly due to rivalries between criminal gangs called either “syndicates” (sindicatos) or “pranatos,” the latter of which is a type of mafia that originated in Venezuela’s prison system and whose leaders are called “pranes.” Mining pranatos have successfully established themselves and now set the standard for all illegal businesses thriving on the unchecked pilfering of Venezuela’s mineral deposits.

SEE ALSO: What Is Behind Killings in Venezuela Illegal Mining Regions?

What is different about this incident is the alleged role of the ELN. Bolívar’s representative in the National Assembly, Américo De Grazia, was one of the first to confirm it.

“The indigenous and mining communities have been reporting the presence of the ELN in El Bochinche to us since November 2017,” he told InSight Crime.

Colombian President Iván Duque has also mentioned the likelihood of the ELN transferring some of its criminal enclaves to Venezuelan territory -- with the “support” of Nicolás Maduro’s government. This week, he shut down any possibility of dialogue with the guerrilla group if their criminal activities continue.

InSight Crime Analysis

While it is believed that the ELN has expanded into Venezuelan territory, it remains difficult to determine just how well established it is. But its alleged presence more than 1,500 kilometers from the Colombian border could mean it is poised to enter into another war -- this time for gold -- and its first battles would be with the criminal gangs operating along the borders with Guyana and Brazil. The ELN could be making headway into Venezuela in search of new opportunities to expand its criminal economies.

SEE ALSO: Venezuela: A Mafia State?

Congressman De Grazia explained that approximately 100 armed and uniformed members of the ELN have allegedly settled in El Bochinche, where the latest attack on miners took place.

“They seized the Hermanos Hernández logging operation and installed a camp there,” he added.

De Grazia also alleged that the ELN and government authorities in the mining areas have formed an alliance as part of a corruption network that reaches all the way to Caracas and involves top military and civil officials.

“The government of President Nicolás Maduro is very satisfied with the work the ELN has done. They appreciate that they’ve displaced the pranatos in controlling illegal mining. The government thinks of the ELN as serious people with whom they can negotiate. That’s why they’re acting with impunity. They moved towards Cedeño [a municipality in Bolívar state] and took over the coltan and diamond mining. Now for about a year we’ve seen them fighting over the gold mines at the other end of the country, on the border with Guyana,” the politician told InSight Crime.

SEE ALSO: ELN en Venezuela

Javier Tarazona, director of non-governmental organization Fundaredes, has been following the ELN’s expansion into Venezuela. He agrees with De Grazia regarding the potential shift in “criminal governments” in the country’s mining regions.

“The government has lost control of the mining pranato and is appealing to the greater fire power that the ELN may have. It’s operating as an armed branch of the ruling party to keep the illegal mining profits coming in,” Tarazone said.

Illegal mining is a criminal economy that the ELN has already been exploiting in Colombian territory. The current situation in Venezuela -- in part because authorities seem to lack the will to intervene -- makes it easier for the group to fill its coffers and strengthen its criminal structures with the resources it gets from gold mining. Add to this the pressure the Colombian government is putting on the guerrilla group by ending the ceasefire, and seeking refuge on the other side of the border may seem like an attractive option for the ELN now more than ever.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 26 FEB 2013

A report by the United Nations states that the influence of South American criminal groups in West Africa may be…

COLOMBIA / 10 AUG 2016

Officials from Colombia and Venezuela forged ahead with new bilateral mechanisms targeting transnational organized crime and prepared to reopen their…

ECUADOR / 11 JUL 2011

The arrest of a suspected member of the Russian mafia in Ecuador has prompted a U.S. official to describe it…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Conversation with Paraguay Judicial Operators on PCC

24 JUN 2021

InSight Crime Co-director Steven Dudley formed part of a panel attended by over 500 students, all of whom work in Paraguay's judicial system.

THE ORGANIZATION

Combating Environmental Crime in Colombia

15 JUN 2021

InSight Crime presented findings from an investigation into the main criminal activities fueling environmental destruction in Colombia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Collaborating on Citizen Security Initiatives

8 JUN 2021

Co-director Steven Dudley worked with Chemonics, a DC-based development firm, to analyze the organization’s citizen security programs in Mexico.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Deepens Its Connections with Universities

31 MAY 2021

A partnership with the University for Peace will complement InSight Crime’s research methodology and expertise on Costa Rica.

THE ORGANIZATION

With Support from USAID, InSight Crime Will Investigate Organized Crime in Haiti

31 MAY 2021

The project will seek to map out Haiti's principal criminal economies, profile the specific groups and actors, and detail their links to elements of the state.