HomeNewsAnalysisPolice Losing Members; Cartels Gaining Them
ANALYSIS

Police Losing Members; Cartels Gaining Them

JUAREZ CARTEL / 12 NOV 2010 BY INSIGHT CRIME EN

Five hundred seventy-two police have left the municipal force in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, the embattled town along the Texas border, Mexico’s El Milenio news organization revealed.

Five hundred seventy-two police have left the municipal force in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, the embattled town along the Texas border, Mexico’s El Milenio news organization revealed. Meanwhile, according to El Diario newspaper, the Chihuahua state attorney general said that the drug gangs have 8,000 foot-soldiers working for them in the city of Ciudad Juarez. The two numbers tell a larger story about the government’s attempt to corral the spiraling violence. Municipal police forces have been decimated by defections, filters and fear. Thousands have left their posts. Many others are thought to work with the cartels, Reynosa not excluded. Meanwhile, the criminal organizations have a seemingly endless supply of muscle, messengers and other menial laborers available in spite of the violence. In Juarez, these include members of the Sinaloa and Juarez Cartels, who are battling for control of the city, and their various proxy gangs, among them the Aztecas and La Línea for the Juarez Cartel, and the Mexicles and Artistas Asesinos for the Sinaloa Cartel.

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