HomeNewsBriefBrazil Plans to Dispose of Seized Goods, Reduce Corruption
BRIEF

Brazil Plans to Dispose of Seized Goods, Reduce Corruption

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 19 JUL 2011 BY JEN SOKATCH EN

Brazil's government is considering changing the law so that contraband seized on the borders need not be stored by the state for the duration of court cases against alleged traffickers.

Vice-President Michel Temer said that Brazil is considering sending a measure to Congress that mean that seized goods, such as cars, weapons, and drugs, would be certified and then disposed of. Any illegal drugs would be burnt, and items like vehicles or electronics would be auctioned off.

The idea of this measure would be to reduce the opportunity for corruption, for example remove the risk that officials could be bribed to return the goods to criminals.

As Temer put it, “Often there are seizures of 10 tons of marijuana, five tons of cocaine, cars and electronics that are crammed into one place, and often this creates corruption.”

Temer will meet with the ministers of justice, defense, environment, finance and strategic affairs on Wednesday to further discuss the issue.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 9 SEP 2020

A series of police operations in Brazil have shown that the poaching of exotic species appears to have exploded during…

BRAZIL / 15 NOV 2013

Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon, which hit a low point in 2012, is on the rise again according to authorities, evidence…

HONDURAS / 12 JAN 2017

Authorities in Honduras have dismantled several networks of allegedly corrupt law enforcement officers, a positive sign for the country's efforts…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…

THE ORGANIZATION

Backing Investigative Journalism Around the Globe

5 NOV 2021

InSight Crime was a proud supporter of this year's Global Investigative Journalism Conference, which took place November 1 through November 5 and convened nearly 2,000 journalists…

THE ORGANIZATION

Tracking Dirty Money and Tren de Aragua

29 OCT 2021

InSight Crime was delighted to support investigative reporting in the Americas through a workshop with our friends at Connectas, a non-profit journalism initiative that facilitates collaboration…