HomeNewsBriefBrief: FARC in Venezuela? Depends on What You Mean
BRIEF

Brief: FARC in Venezuela? Depends on What You Mean

COLOMBIA / 18 APR 2011 BY INSIGHT CRIME EN

In an interview with the radio station La FM in Colombia, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said that leftist guerrillas operate in Venezuela but do not have camps in that country. This follows the president's statement last week, published in Semana -- "We are certain those encampents no longer exist" -- which was met with strong criticism from loyalists to former President Alvaro Uribe. Uribe's government had mounted an international campaign to criminalize Venzuela's government of President Hugo Chavez by linking it to the FARC; the move caused the two countries to briefly break relations when Santos came into office. Santos has taken a decidedly more conciliatory stance. His statement last week had contradicted the previous government's reports, including to the Organization of American States in July 2010, in which Uribe administration officials provided maps and detailed coordinates to bolster its argument that the major leaders of Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia - FARC) had set up large camps in Venezuela and the Venezuelan government was providing them with a sanctuary. Uribe himself tweeted in recent days: "Terrorist hideout: Where are FARC kingpins: 'Ivan Marquez', 'Romaña', 'Grannobles', 'Timochenko'?," in references to the FARC's top leadership. In what is a sure sign of the tricky balance Santos may strike, the Colombian president has backtracked again, saying that he only meant that the encampents as structures per se had ceased to exist 

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COLOMBIA / 3 MAR 2021

Colombia is one of the world’s most biodiverse countries, home to some 1,800 species of birds, 600 species of amphibians,…

COLOMBIA / 8 JUN 2021

Repeated attacks on teams recovering stolen lands in Colombia highlight the risks involved in restitution, a little-known process that is…

CACHIROS / 28 DEC 2020

A rush of drug plane traffic from South America, coupled with traffickers smuggling large cocaine shipments after coronavirus border restrictions…

About InSight Crime

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Extensive Coverage of our Chronicles of a Cartel Bodyguard

23 SEP 2022

Our recent investigation, A Cartel Bodyguard in Mexico’s 'Hot Land', has received extensive media coverage.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime, American University Host Illegal Fishing Panel

19 SEP 2022

InSight Crime and the Center for Latin American & Latino Studies (CLALS) at American University discussed the findings of a joint investigation on IUU fishing at a September 9 conference.

THE ORGANIZATION

Impact on the Media Landscape

9 SEP 2022

InSight Crime’s first investigation on the Dominican Republic made an immediate impact on the Dominican media landscape, with major news outlets republishing and reprinting our findings, including in …

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Sharpens Its Skills

2 SEP 2022

Last week, the InSight Crime team gathered for our annual retreat in Colombia, where we discussed our vision and strategy for the next 12 months.  During the week, we also learned how to…

THE ORGANIZATION

Colombia’s Fragile Path to Peace Begins to Take Shape

26 AUG 2022

InSight Crime is charting the progress of President Gustavo Petro’s agenda as he looks to revolutionize Colombia’s security policy, opening dialogue with guerrillas, reforming the military and police, and…