HomeNewsBriefU.S. Citizens in Danger of Drug-Related Homicides?
BRIEF

U.S. Citizens in Danger of Drug-Related Homicides?

HOMICIDES / 18 APR 2011 BY INSIGHT CRIME EN

It is no secret that drug-related violence originating from feuds between drug trafficking oganizations (DTOs) in Mexico has been spilling over to the U.S., especially in cities where more than one cartel wants to impose their rules on the market.

The extent of the spillover violence, however, is hotly debated: the U.S. remains a consumer country, and violence levels here are nowhere near those in producer and transit countries like Colombia and Mexico. Citing U.S. State Department figures, MSNBC reports that 106 U.S. citizens were murdered in relation to DTO activity in 2010, almost triple the numbers registered in 2007. Other U.S. officials have asserted, citing information from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that Mexican groups are now present in 230 cities, helpfully illustrated by this map from El Universal.

Critics counter that border cities like El Paso, San Diego, Brownsville and McAllen have consistently registered low levels of violence. Meanwhile, the U.S. justice system works far more efficiently than Mexico's and may discourage Mexican gang members from drawing too much attention to themselves with mass killings on U.S. territory. Drugs may continue to penetrate U.S. terrority, accompanied by druglords looking out for their interests, but it is unlikely that violence will increase in proportion.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

ARGENTINA / 15 OCT 2013

Violent deaths among youth in Argentina are at a ten-year high in a pattern that may point to the rise…

EL SALVADOR / 11 MAY 2017

US aid funding for Central America will be reduced in 2017. And while news reports have largely focused on…

COCAINE / 24 NOV 2021

An unusually drawn-out feud between two rival gangs in northern Costa Rica has left over 150 people dead in five…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Who Are Memo Fantasma and Sergio Roberto de Carvalho?

24 JUN 2022

Inside the criminal career of Memo Fantasma  In March 2020, InSight Crime revealed the identity and whereabouts of Memo Fantasma, a paramilitary commander and drug trafficker living in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Environmental and Academic Praise

17 JUN 2022

InSight Crime’s six-part series on the plunder of the Peruvian Amazon continues to inform the debate on environmental security in the region. Our Environmental Crimes Project Manager, María Fernanda Ramírez,…

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Series on Plunder of Peru’s Amazon Makes Headlines

10 JUN 2022

Since launching on June 2, InSight Crime’s six-part series on environmental crime in Peru’s Amazon has been well-received. Detailing the shocking impunity enjoyed by those plundering the rainforest, the investigation…

THE ORGANIZATION

Duarte’s Death Makes Waves

3 JUN 2022

The announcement of the death of Gentil Duarte, one of the top dissident commanders of the defunct Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), continues to reverberate in Venezuela and Colombia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Cattle Trafficking Acclaim, Investigation into Peru’s Amazon 

27 MAY 2022

On May 18, InSight Crime launched its most recent investigation into cattle trafficking between Central America and Mexico. It showed precisely how beef, illicitly produced in Honduras, Guatemala…