HomeNewsBriefColombian Paramilitary Warlord Gets 33 Years in U.S.
BRIEF

Colombian Paramilitary Warlord Gets 33 Years in U.S.

AUC / 10 NOV 2011 BY JEREMY MCDERMOTT EN

One of Colombia's most powerful paramilitary leaders has been condemned by a Miami court to 33 years in prison, convicted of "leading an international drug trafficking ring which backed a terrorist organization."

Carlos Mario Jimenez, better known by his alias "Macaco" was perhaps the most powerful commander in the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC). He led the Central Bolívar Bloc of the paramilitary army, which demobilized more than 5000 fighters during the peace process with the government. The AUC was on the U.S. list of terrorist organizations.

While Jimenez turned himself in as part of the government's amnesty legislation, the Peace and Justice Law, it was determined that he continued to run his drug trafficking empire while in prison, and therefore was not eligible for its benefits. He was considered so dangerous, that in the lead up to his extradition in 2008 he was kept not in a maximum security prison, but aboard a Colombian frigate on the high seas.

The drug trafficking networks, and much of the territory that Jimenez controlled, are mainly under the control of the Rastrojos, now one of Colombia's most powerful transnational criminal organizations.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 4 OCT 2022

Corruption, no supervision, and poor legislation have led to Latin American military weapons ending up in criminal hands.

COLOMBIA / 25 FEB 2022

A veteran FARC dissident commander was killed in a Colombian military assault, leaving a power vacuum in the volatile Colombia-Venezuela…

COLOMBIA / 3 MAR 2021

Colombia is one of the world’s most biodiverse countries, home to some 1,800 species of birds, 600 species of amphibians,…

About InSight Crime

WORK WITH US

Open Position: Full Stack WordPress Developer

28 NOV 2022

As Full Stack WordPress Developer You Will: Work collaboratively with other developers and designers to maintain and improve organizational standards.Demonstrate a high level of attention to detail, and implement best…

THE ORGANIZATION

Join Us This #GivingTuesday in Exposing Organized Crime

24 NOV 2022

For over twelve years, InSight Crime has contributed to the global dialogue on organized crime and corruption. Our work has provided policymakers, analysts, academics, journalists, and the general public with…

THE ORGANIZATION

Like Crime, Our Coverage Knows No Borders

18 NOV 2022

The nature of global organized crime means that while InSight Crime focuses on Latin America, we also follow criminal dynamics worldwide. InSight Crime investigator Alessandro Ford covers the connections between Latin American and European…

THE ORGANIZATION

Using Data to Expose Crime

11 NOV 2022

Co-director Jeremy McDermott made a virtual presentation at a conference hosted by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). The ‘Sixth International Conference on Governance, Crime, and Justice…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime ON AIR

4 NOV 2022

InSight Crime Co-director Steven Dudley was interviewed for the podcast The Rosenberg Case: A Tale of Murder, Corruption, and Conspiracy in Guatemala, which explores the potential involvement of then president, Álvaro Colom,…