HomeNewsBriefCosta Rican President: Crime is Country's Largest Threat Ever
BRIEF

Costa Rican President: Crime is Country's Largest Threat Ever

COSTA RICA / 3 JAN 2012 BY GEOFFREY RAMSEY EN

With Costa Rica increasingly becoming host to international drug trafficking organizations, President Laura Chinchilla claims that the Central American country’s democratic institutions, which have a relatively strong reputation, have never faced such a serious threat.

In an interview with the Global Post, President Chinchilla claimed that her country is doing its best to fight the recent crime epidemic, but needs “more instruments, more resources, and more international cooperation” to win.

The Costa Rican president also characterized organized crime as one of the biggest threats to the country in its history. “This has to do with the institutions, and what [drug cartels] do is corrupt institutions to disrupt the legal system and the rule of law,” Chinchilla said. “I don’t remember in our whole history a menace like this menace from organized crime”

InSight Crime Analysis

Costa Rica has long stood out as a bastion of peaceful democracy in a historically unstable region. It is the only country in Central America with no standing army, and has not had an internal political conflict since 1949.  But while it is still the least violent country in the region, drug trafficking is on the rise. 

As InSight Crime has reported in a three-part series on the subject, drug trafficking networks from Mexico and other countries are increasingly using the country for drug trafficking, and the capacity of local police to combat organized crime is questionable. 

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COSTA RICA / 23 OCT 2013

Four out of five people detained by Costa Rica's special police task force during the first nine months of 2013…

COSTA RICA / 20 FEB 2017

Authorities in Costa Rica are worried that the dismantling of Colombia's main guerrilla group could threaten the Central American country's…

COSTA RICA / 16 OCT 2015

The recent bust of a cocaine smuggling operation has uncovered the presence of the Italian mafia in Costa…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.