HomeNewsBriefDoes Leader's Death Mark Demise of Paraguay Guerrilla Group?
BRIEF

Does Leader's Death Mark Demise of Paraguay Guerrilla Group?

EPP / 7 JAN 2015 BY JAMES BARGENT EN

The killing of one of the founding members of the ACA guerrillas could spell the end for Paraguay's breakaway rebels and their alleged plan to tap into the country's drug trade wealth.

On the night of January 5, members of Paraguay's anti-guerrilla Joint Task Force (FTC) opened fire on a group of Armed Peasant Association (ACA) guerrillas, killing leader and founder Albino Jara Larrea along with a teenage girl.

Police sources told ABC they had been patrolling the region for several days before finding the rebels -- who are a splinter group of the larger Paraguayan People's Army (EPP) -- in a rural area to the east of the city of Concepcion.

Authorities told ABC Jara had been armed with an AK-47 at the time of the shooting, while a local prosecutor told Ultima Hora he was also carrying over $10,000 in Paraguayan guaranies and a number of cell phones and memory cards.

With an estimated five or six guerrillas accompanying Jara, some of whom security forces say may have been injured in the attack, the FTC has announced that it will continue to hunt down the remaining ACA members, reported Ultima Hora.

InSight Crime Analysis

The ACA is a new armed group believed to have been founded last year by Jara and his brother Alfredo, both of whom are former EPP fighters. FTC sources told InSight Crime the pair had been a disruptive influence in the EPP due to their lack of discipline and predilections for drinking and womanizing. They likely set up their own dissident group after securing over $230,000 in ransom money from the kidnapping of a businessman.

SEE ALSO: Coverage of the EPP

Initially the group was believed to number fewer than 15 fighters, and Paraguay's anti-drug agency said they had set their sights on growing by funding themselves through the local drug trade -- Paraguay is South America's largest marijuana producer and a major cocaine transit country.

However, even before the killing of Jara, the ACA had suffered a major setback when security forces killed five fighters in September last year.

The group is now likely to amount to little more a handful of fighters -- some of whom may be wounded -- led by Jara's brother Alfredo and is unlikely to pose a serious security threat in the future. Short of a miraculous turnaround, their options now appear limited to pleading to reintegrate into the EPP, turning themselves in, or fighting to the bitter end.

Meanwhile, the FTC has been unable to take down the EPP, thanks in part to the guerrilla group's network of local collaborators, which provides intelligence information and support. The EPP managed to keep kidnapping victim Arlan Fick hostage for close to nine months while the FTC unsuccessfully searched for the teenager, who was released in December

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 27 MAR 2017

A recent spate of violence on the border between Brazil and Paraguay suggests a battle for control of drug trafficking…

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 15 JUL 2011

Brazil’s Federal Police say that arms traffickers are using new routes to get weapons into the country, with entry through…

BRAZIL / 8 MAR 2021

Criminal dynamics in Brazil, particularly its drug trafficking routes, have been shaken up in recent years by the rapid expansion…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…