HomeNewsBrief'FARC Rebels Tied to Traffickers in Bolivia'
BRIEF

'FARC Rebels Tied to Traffickers in Bolivia'

BOLIVIA / 22 DEC 2011 BY RONAN GRAHAM EN

Drug traffickers with close ties to Colombian guerrilla group the FARC are operating in Bolivia, according to the country’s anti-narcotics police force.

The head of the Special Anti-Narcotics Police (FELCN), Jose Quezada Camacho, said in a report that a drug laboratory uncovered by Bolivian security forces in October had been operated by a group of Colombian traffickers working with the FARC.

The drug lab, situated in the Isiboro Secure National Park and Indigenous Territory, in the Cochabamba province, operated on a very large scale. According to Bolivia’s defense minister, Ruben Saavedra Soto, it had a daily production capacity of over 100 kilos of high-purity cocaine, and had been in operation for at least three years.

In gunfights when taking over the lab, Bolivian security forces killed two suspects who were later revealed to be Colombian nationals Yeison David Sosa Rincon and Jose Wilmar Toro Garcia.

According to Jose Camacho Quezada, intelligence reports received from Colombia’s national police confirmed that Sosa, Toro, and other Colombian nationals who escaped from the laboratory during the fighting had established the cocaine refining laboratory, and that they were all “linked to the FARC."

The Cochabamba region is one of Bolivia’s main cocaine producing regions. As InSight Crime has previously reported, the area around Santa Cruz in eastern Bolivia has recently emerged as a major drug trafficking hub, forming part of a “drug highway” connecting Cochabamba to West Africa and Europe.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COLOMBIA / 10 JAN 2013

Colombia's main criminal groups and leftist guerrillas along the Pacific Coast have aligned to traffic drugs in certain areas but…

BOLIVIA / 8 JAN 2020

Bolivian authorities were taken by surprise on November 7, 2018, when they captured three Venezuelans during an operation to dismantle…

BOLIVIA / 9 AUG 2012

In an effort to ease overcrowding in its troubled prison system, the Bolivian government announced that it may pardon and…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.