HomeNewsBriefLulzsec Hackers: US Failed to Inform Mexico of El Chapo's Whereabouts
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Lulzsec Hackers: US Failed to Inform Mexico of El Chapo's Whereabouts

CYBERCRIME / 27 JUN 2011 BY JEN SOKATCH EN

Hackers released documents yesterday claiming Arizona law officials knew the location of fugitive drug lord Joaquin Guzman, alias "El Chapo," two years ago, but failed to inform Mexico's authorities of his whereabouts.

In what the group is calling “Operation Chinga la Migra,” the hacker group Lulz Security, or LulzSec, has announced that it is releasing over 700 classified documents in retaliation for SB 1070, the strict Arizona immigration law that sparked controversy around the world when passed last year.

According to the leaked documents, U.S. authorities were informed of a party that Guzman and other high-ranking members of the Sinaloa Cartel attended in Sonoita, Mexico, near the Sonora-Arizona border on January 26, 2009. However, the Arizona officials who learned of the get-together made no attempt to inform Mexican authorities.

Guzman, the most wanted drug trafficker in Mexico, is the leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, widely considered the most powerful drug trafficking gang in the world. Despite his notoriety, he has remained at large since his escape from prison in January 2001.

LulzSec has recently been involved in anti-government hacks in Latin America, as InSight Crime noted last week, but has been primarily concerned with “pranks” such as dismantling gaming websites and taking high profile sites offline for a few hours.

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