HomeNewsBriefImpunity at 90% in Calderon’s Mexico
BRIEF

Impunity at 90% in Calderon’s Mexico

JUDICIAL REFORM / 25 JAN 2012 BY EDWARD FOX EN

Some 90 percent of people arrested during Felipe Calderon’s first five years as president of Mexico went free, according to the UN.

Raul Benitez Manaut, a consultant for the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), stated that of the 500,000 people arrested in Mexico since Calderon came to power in late 2006, around 450,000 were later freed, reported Proceso.

Benitez attributed the high rate of impunity to Mexico’s inquisitorial system of justice -- where the accused is  presumed guilty -- high levels of corruption among state officials, and inefficient investigating agencies with poorly integrated records.

InSight Crime Analysis

Mexico is currently in the process of reforming its judicial system, breaking from the archaic inquisitorial system to a more modern adversarial one where innocence is presumed rather than guilt, and trials are made more open to the public.

In 2008, Mexico’s National Human Rights Commission (CNDH) put the impunity rate as high as 99 percent.

While Calderon’s administration has launched a heavily militarized assault on drug gangs, using the  armed forces to apprehend suspects, the lack of similar emphasis on the judicial side means that impunity remains the Achilles Heel of his anti-drug trafficking drive.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

MEXICO / 3 JUN 2013

Mexico's Navy has arrested Eduardo Treviño Treviño, a close relative of the Zetas' top leader, wanted by the US DEA…

EXTORTION / 2 SEP 2011

Though notorious for their brutality, Mexico’s organized criminal groups are rational actors who respond to market dynamics. If they are…

EXTORTION / 5 FEB 2014

Mexico mining companies extorted by criminal groups are reportedly paying Michoacan self-defense forces for protection, a development that places the…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.

THE ORGANIZATION

Unraveling the Web of Elites Connected to Organized Crime

27 JUL 2021

InSight Crime published Elites and Organized Crime in Nicaragua, a deep dive into the relationships between criminal actors and elites in that Central American nation.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime’s Greater Focus on US-Mexico Border

20 JUL 2021

InSight Crime has decided to turn many of its investigative resources towards understanding and chronicling the criminal dynamics along the US-Mexico border.

THE ORGANIZATION

Key Arrests and Police Budget Increases Due to InSight Crime Investigations

8 JUL 2021

With Memo Fantasma’s arrest, InSight Crime has proven that our investigations can and will uncover major criminal threats in the Americas.

THE ORGANIZATION

Organized Crime’s Influence on Gender-Based Violence

30 JUN 2021

InSight Crime investigator Laura N. Ávila spoke on organized crime and gender-based violence at the launch of a research project by the United Nations Development Programme.