HomeNewsBriefMexican Goalkeeper 'Helped Kidnappers Pick Rich Victims'
BRIEF

Mexican Goalkeeper 'Helped Kidnappers Pick Rich Victims'

GULF CARTEL / 9 JAN 2012 BY HANNAH STONE EN

A goalkeeper suspended from a first-division soccer team in Monterrey, north Mexico, has been arrested on charges of helping a kidnapping ring to select wealthy targets.

Omar Ortiz, known as “El Gato,” was suspended almost two years ago after failing a drug test for banned steroids. He then allegedly became involved with a group that kidnapped wealthy people to extort money from them.

The group was linked to the Gulf Cartel, and was responsible for some 20 abductions, according to the authorities. Ortiz's alleged role was to help them choose targets, as he moved in well-heeled social circles.

Mexican media have reported that Ortiz began working with the group after suffering financial difficulties because of his suspension.

InSight Crime Analysis

Kidnappings spiked dramatically in Mexico in 2011, increasing by more than a third from the previous year, according to a government report.

The rise has been driven in part by criminal groups moving into abduction as a safer source of revenue, as the government cracks down on the drug trade. This latest evidence that gangs are hiring "insiders" in the monied classes to help them target victims is an indication that some groups may be using more sophisticated tactics, aiming to extort large amounts of money at one time, instead of kidnapping indiscriminately.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BELTRAN LEYVA ORG / 27 JAN 2014

Authorities in Mexico have uncovered evidence of an alliance between the Knights Templar and the Beltran Leyva Organization (BLO), marking…

MEXICO / 19 JUL 2012

An entire municipal police force in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua have resigned from their posts citing threats from…

GENDER AND CRIME / 4 FEB 2014

Sex traffickers in Mexico have reportedly begun using underage girls to recruit other minors for sexual exploitation, reflecting a broader…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…