HomeNewsBriefMexico Captures Another 'Mastermind' of Migrant Massacre
BRIEF

Mexico Captures Another 'Mastermind' of Migrant Massacre

HUMAN SMUGGLING / 9 OCT 2012 BY GEOFFREY RAMSEY EN

Mexican authorities claim to have captured the Zetas boss behind a 2010 massacre of 72 Central American migrants -- the second time they have claimed to have found the man behind this crime.

On October 8, Mexican Navy spokesman Jose Luis Vergara announced that authorities had arrested Salvador Alfonso Martinez Escobedo, alias “Ardilla,” a Zetas boss who Vergara said was the mastermind of the 2010 killings in San Fernando, Tamaulipas. Martinez is also accused of committing at least 50 other murders.

According to officials, Martinez is a close confidant of Zetas kingpin Miguel Angel Treviño Morales, alias “Z-40,” and managed the group’s turf battle against the rival Gulf Cartel.

InSight Crime Analysis

This is the second time that the authorities have claimed to have captured the "mastermind" behind the San Fernando massacre. In April 2011, Omar Martin Estrada, alias “El Kilo,” was identified as the "intellectual author" of the killings.

The high profile of the massacre creates an incentive for the Mexican authorities to claim that the case has been solved, reflecting a political need to identify a “bad guy” that authorities can hold up as proof of their success.

In addition to the massacre, officials have alleged that Martinez orchestrated two mass prison breaks. The first involved the escape of 151 prisoners in 2010 from a Nuevo Laredo Jail, and the second occurred in September in the border city of Piedras Negras, when 131 inmates escaped. He has also been accused of killing US citizen David Hartley in 2010, while the latter was waterskiing on Falcon Lake on the US-Mexico border.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COVID AND CRIME / 4 MAR 2021

Illegally buying endangered species via social media has grown increasingly convenient in Mexico, especially given its feeble environmental controls and…

DRUG POLICY / 4 DEC 2015

Mexico's President Enrique Peña Nieto has reiterated his disapproval of legalizing marijuana in the country, setting the tables for a…

EL MENCHO / 14 MAY 2021

In some regions of Mexico, family members who came up empty-handed this Mother's Day were bailed out by the Jalisco…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…

THE ORGANIZATION

Backing Investigative Journalism Around the Globe

5 NOV 2021

InSight Crime was a proud supporter of this year's Global Investigative Journalism Conference, which took place November 1 through November 5 and convened nearly 2,000 journalists…

THE ORGANIZATION

Tracking Dirty Money and Tren de Aragua

29 OCT 2021

InSight Crime was delighted to support investigative reporting in the Americas through a workshop with our friends at Connectas, a non-profit journalism initiative that facilitates collaboration…