HomeNewsBriefMexican Hotels Complain of Federal Police's Unpaid Bills
BRIEF

Mexican Hotels Complain of Federal Police's Unpaid Bills

MEXICO / 26 NOV 2012 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

Hotel owners in Mexico say that the federal police owe millions of pesos in unpaid bills, suggesting that the agency may be struggling to complete basic administrative tasks.

The former head of the Hotel Association of Nayarit state told El Universal that the federal police are in debt to some 80 hotels across the country. This includes 30 hotels in Nuevo Leon, one of the most violent states in Mexico, where over 2,000 murders were registered last year. Some of the bills are as high as 4 million pesos (about $310,000), the former Hotel Association head said. 

Coahuila-based newspaper Zocalo interviewed four hotel owners who made similar complaints, stating the federal police owed them between 5 and 8 million ($390,000-$620,000).

One hotel owner in a small town in Michoacan state, who said he'd housed some 100 police agents, blamed bureaucracy for the delay. He told Zocalo that the federal police used to pay the bill directly, but then contracted the job to the Institute for Social Security and Services for State Workers (ISSSTE), which in turn contracted it out to another company.

InSight Crime Analysis

The government has approved ever-larger budgets for accommodation costs for federal agents over the past few years. This coincides with the surge of federal security forces across the country, ordered by President Felipe Calderon. According to a report released earlier this year by the Secretariat of Public Security (SSP), federal police spending on lodging increased 729 percent in a five-year period, from about 5.7 million pesos (about $440,000) budgeted in 2007, to about 42 million pesos in 2011 (about $3.2 million). With an expansion of this magnitude, it was perhaps inevitable that the federal police's administrative arm would struggle to keep up with hotel payments.

Mexican police stay at hotels because of logistical and safety concerns. Earlier this year in Juarez, the city mandated that all municipal police must begin staying at hotels for their own safety.

As a result, hotels are frequently attacked by criminal organizations looking to target police. A hotel administrator and two police agents died after one such attack in Durango in September.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

GULF CARTEL / 19 MAR 2013

Inconsistent reports about a March 10 gun battle in Reynosa, along the US-Mexico border, illustrate how little verifiable information is…

COSTA RICA / 29 AUG 2017

Nearly every country in Latin America is struggling to combat high rates of impunity, according to a new report…

GENDER AND CRIME / 5 MAR 2012

In the midst of a years-long fight against the Zetas for control of prized sections of borderland territory,…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.