HomeNewsBriefMexico Seizes 'Zetas' Communications System
BRIEF

Mexico Seizes 'Zetas' Communications System

MEXICO / 2 DEC 2011 BY RONAN GRAHAM EN

Mexican army troops have dismantled a sophisticated communications network, believed to have been operated by the Zetas drug gang to conduct internal communications and monitor the movements of the security forces.

A statement from the Defense Department (SEDENA) said that military personnel dismantled the network in the northern border states of Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, San Luis Potosi and Tamaulipas following a 12-month operation.

Although the statement did not give the name of the drug cartel operating the network, the Zetas have extensive operations in these areas.

The military confiscated more than 1,400 radios, 2,600 cell phones and computer equipment during the operation, as well as power supplies including solar panels, according the Defense Department.

The equipment was found in rural, sparsely populated areas of the four states. According a military source, the antennas were painted green to blend in with the surroundings.

Officials claim that the dismantling of the communications network will be a blow to the gang that operated it, leaving them without any means of gathering information on the location of the security forces.

In November, the Defense Department announced that the army had dismantled a $350,000 radio communications network, allegedly operated by the Zetas in Coahuila state.

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