HomeNewsBriefMore Soldiers on Mexico Streets Fails to Improve Security
BRIEF

More Soldiers on Mexico Streets Fails to Improve Security

MEXICO / 7 OCT 2016 BY MICHAEL LOHMULLER EN

The number of Mexican soldiers in policing roles has doubled under President Enrique Peña Nieto, but a new report illustrates how the militarization of domestic security has failed to produce significant improvements in public safety.

The number of Mexican soldiers involved in public security functions increased from 1,680 in 2012 when Peña Nieto first took office to 3,386 in 2016, according to Animal Político. The number of military vehicles being used to support domestic security likewise increased during this period, from 160 to 368.

These figures, however, do not include soldiers deployed on temporary operations to regions experiencing acute levels of violence, the news outlet reported. 

Moreover, in 2012, there were 75 bases of “mixed operations” throughout Mexico, where soldiers involved in public security roles are stationed. This number grew to 142 by 2016.

The state of Guerrero has the most mixed operation bases, with 28. Overall, the army is currently deployed in 24 states, or 75 percent of the country.

Yet increased military presence has not led to increased security gains. When comparing statistics from September 2011 through August 2012 to the same time period from 2015 to 2016, Animal Político found the number of criminals apprehended, and the quantity of vehicles, firearms and grenades seized by the military fell by more than 50 percent. 

InSight Crime Analysis

As Animal Político notes, the deployment of the military began as a temporary measure under former Mexican President Felipe Calderón (2006 – 2012). Upon taking office, Calderón’s successor, Peña Nieto, decided to keep the military on the streets while state police forces were strengthened.

But while involving the military in domestic security is seen as a way to bypass or supplement corrupt or inadequate police forces, this strategy has generated heavy criticism from security experts and has been accompanied by concerns about its impact on human rights.

SEE ALSO: Mexico News and Profiles 

Such criticism in Mexico has even come from within the military itself. In 2015, Mexico’s Secretary of National Defense, General Salvador Cienfuegos, announced the army would continue conducting patrols in the streets since police forces had not “yet been reconfigured.”

“We feel uncomfortable,” Cienfuegos added. “We did not ask for this and we did not train for this.”

Cienfuegos has been vocal in calling for Mexico to adopt a legal framework limiting the army’s involvement in policing roles, legislation he began lobbying for in 2013. Indeed, Cienfuegos has said that sending “soldiers prepared for war” to fight criminals has caused “serious problems” and puts civilian populations at risk.  

Indeed, the Mexican army has been implicated in several human rights scandals in recent years, perhaps most notably the June 2014 Tlatlya massacre, when soldiers executed at least 12 people. 

Compartir icon icon icon

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Related Content

MEXICO / 16 MAR 2016

The commander of Mexico's armed forces has said it was a mistake to deploy the country's military to combat drug…

AYOTZINAPA / 17 SEP 2015

Forensic experts have identified the remains of another missing student among the 43 who disappeared in Iguala, Mexico in 2014,…

JALISCO CARTEL / 31 AUG 2012

A Southern Pulse report on the Mexico city of Guadalajara provides the framework to better understand both present events --…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

We Have Updated Our Website

4 FEB 2021

Welcome to our new home page. We have revamped the site to create a better display and reader experience.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Events – Border Crime: The Northern Triangle and Tri-Border Area

ARGENTINA / 25 JAN 2021

Through several rounds of extensive field investigations, our researchers have analyzed and mapped out the main illicit economies and criminal groups present in 39 border departments spread across the six countries of study – the Northern Triangle trio of Guatemala, Honduras, and El…

BRIEF

InSight Crime’s ‘Memo Fantasma’ Investigation Wins Simón Bolívar National Journalism Prize

COLOMBIA / 20 NOV 2020

The staff at InSight Crime was awarded the prestigious Simón Bolívar national journalism prize in Colombia for its two-year investigation into the drug trafficker known as “Memo Fantasma,” which was…

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – From Uncovering Organized Crime to Finding What Works

COLOMBIA / 12 NOV 2020

This project began 10 years ago as an effort to address a problem: the lack of daily coverage, investigative stories and analysis of organized crime in the Americas. …

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – Ten Years of Investigating Organized Crime in the Americas

FEATURED / 2 NOV 2020

In early 2009, Steven Dudley was in Medellín, Colombia. His assignment: speak to a jailed paramilitary leader in the Itagui prison, just south of the city. Following his interview inside…