HomeNewsBriefMore Zetas Accusations Do Little to Slow Mexico Politician’s Roll
BRIEF

More Zetas Accusations Do Little to Slow Mexico Politician’s Roll

ELITES AND CRIME / 16 JAN 2017 BY STEVEN DUDLEY EN

The testimony of an alleged former Zetas' plaza boss illustrates how deep the criminal syndicate's networks penetrated Coahuila's government in Mexico, a fact that has done little to impede the political ambitions of the former governor and the party boss implicated in the case.

Multiple news sources, including the Mexico Daily News, say an unnamed former Zetas leader told Mexico's Attorney General's Office that former Coahuila Gov. Humberto Moreira (2005-2011) and ex-head of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Institucional - PRI) received "$2 million per month" to permit the criminal group to sell drugs and contraband alcohol in the state.

"Governor Humberto Moreira allowed us to set up over 400 'tienditas' [dispensaries] to sell drugs and alcohol in Saltillo and its surrounding areas [as well as] 240 in Piedras Negras, 100 in Acuña and 80 in the Cinco Manantiales region," the witness reportedly said, referring to different municipalities in the state. (The news reports cite Reforma as the original source for the story and said the testimony was taken by the Attorney General's Office in September.)

The witness added that the criminal group participated in "roundtables" with business and political leaders where they would trade favors.

"The arrangement was: we protected them and we murdered, kidnapped, stole and extorted people they singled out. In exchange, we had the freedom to carry on with our activities throughout the state," the witness reportedly said.

SEE ALSO: Zetas News and Profile

Those meetings were allegedly facilitated by Juan Manuel Muñoz Luévano, alias "El Mono Muñoz," an alleged criminal operator who was arrested in Spain in March 2016 and charged with money laundering and criminal association. Spain approved Muñoz' extradition to the United States on January 13, reported Proceso, where he faces an indictment for various drug and arms trafficking charges.

In a statement published by El Diario de Coahuila, Moreira denied having any connection to Muñoz Luévano.

InSight Crime Analysis

The case is further evidence that while criminal groups may come and go, political corruption seems to live on forever.

Allegations of criminal collusion and widespread corruption by former Zetas have piled up against Moreira, members of his family and his former political allies. But Moreira seems undaunted and had announced in December 2016 that he would run for a congressional seat.

Part of this may be related to the top-level political backing he has received. After Moreira was arrested in Spain in January 2016 on corruption and criminal charges related to his alleged connection to the Zetas, the Mexican government "put their entire diplomatic and legal machine" in motion to free him, according to El Pais.

Moreira was released soon thereafter. The Mexican government later denied it had made any diplomatic or legal push for his release.

SEE ALSO: Mexico News and Profile

This latest testimony also gives another dimension to the deep penetration of the Zetas into that state government, which included control of prisons and police. The results were catastrophic on a human level with hundreds of disappeared, and on a fiscal level since the Coahuila government amassed unprecedented debt

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

LA FAMILIA MICHOACANA / 24 MAY 2011

A Mexican judge released 26 policemen who were accused of links to drug trafficking organization the Familia…

COLOMBIA / 21 MAY 2018

Colombia and Venezuela have shared criminal dynamics for decades. Colombia has pushed cocaine through Venezuela on its journey to US and European markets, while Venezuela’s contraband fuel has…

ELITES AND CRIME / 26 OCT 2019

The guilty plea of Mario Estrada, a former Guatemalan presidential candidate, to conspiring to import cocaine into the United States…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Unraveling the Web of Elites Connected to Organized Crime

27 JUL 2021

InSight Crime published Elites and Organized Crime in Nicaragua, a deep dive into the relationships between criminal actors and elites in that Central American nation.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime’s Greater Focus on US-Mexico Border

20 JUL 2021

InSight Crime has decided to turn many of its investigative resources towards understanding and chronicling the criminal dynamics along the US-Mexico border.

THE ORGANIZATION

Key Arrests and Police Budget Increases Due to InSight Crime Investigations

8 JUL 2021

With Memo Fantasma’s arrest, InSight Crime has proven that our investigations can and will uncover major criminal threats in the Americas.

THE ORGANIZATION

Organized Crime’s Influence on Gender-Based Violence

30 JUN 2021

InSight Crime investigator Laura N. Ávila spoke on organized crime and gender-based violence at the launch of a research project by the United Nations Development Programme.

THE ORGANIZATION

Conversation with Paraguay Judicial Operators on PCC

24 JUN 2021

InSight Crime Co-director Steven Dudley formed part of a panel attended by over 500 students, all of whom work in Paraguay's judicial system.