HomeNewsBriefNew President to Push for US Military Aid to Guatemala
BRIEF

New President to Push for US Military Aid to Guatemala

GUATEMALA / 12 JAN 2012 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

With former General Otto Perez set to assume Guatemala's presidency on January 14, he has indicated that he will continue pushing for the resumption of military aid from the US.

Perez's incoming foreign minister told the AP that Perez will lobby for the resumption of military aid to Guatemala, which authorities argue is needed to fight drug trafficking and crime.

US Congress halted all military aid to Guatemala in 1990, although there are indications that millions of dollars in covert aid continued to flow into the country for some years afterwards. The US relaxed the restrictions somewhat in 2007, allowing for the purchase of helicopters for the Guatemala Air Force, intended to be used to fight drug trafficking.

InSight Crime Analysis

This is a cause taken up by previous administrations, including Perez's predecessor, President Alvaro Colom. During a trip to Washington DC during his final weeks in office, Colom met with a Department of Defense representative and said they'd established six conditions for the partial resumption of military aid to Guatemala.

The condition which might prove the most difficult for Perez's government requires the release of all military documents related to Guatemala's civil war. There is little chance that Perez will prove willing to do so, considering his level of support from the military. He has also faced accusations of committing human rights violations during the conflict.

Another Perez advisor told the AP that Guatemala would look for military aid from other countries, if the US does not help provide the equipment needed to boost law enforcement efforts. This may be subtle reference to the fact that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is set to attend Perez's swearing in ceremony.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

GUATEMALA / 23 SEP 2021

The Jalisco Cartel New Generation, which has rapidly expanded to become Mexico's greatest criminal threat, may now be spreading its…

ELITES AND CRIME / 23 OCT 2020

There is one element that has proven vital to the operational success of international drug trafficking organizations the world over,…

EXTORTION / 13 AUG 2015

According to a recent report, kidnappings in Guatemala have fallen sharply since 2009. However, questions remain about whether Guatemala's success…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.

THE ORGANIZATION

Series on Environmental Crime in the Amazon Generates Headlines

17 SEP 2021

InSight Crime and the Igarapé Institute have been delighted at the response to our joint investigation into environmental crimes in the Colombian Amazon. Coverage of our chapters dedicated to illegal mining…