HomeNewsBriefNicaragua Police Bust Crime Network Linked to Argentine Folk Singer's Death
BRIEF

Nicaragua Police Bust Crime Network Linked to Argentine Folk Singer's Death

GUATEMALA / 28 MAY 2012 BY GEOFFREY RAMSEY EN

Nicaraguan police say they have broken up a criminal network linked to Alejandro Jimenez Gonzalez, the man accused of plotting the attack that killed Argentine singer Facundo Cabral in Guatemala last year.

On May 27, Nicaragua’s National Police announced that they had arrested 11 people linked to Jimenez, including a prominent judge. According to judicial support director Glenda Zavala, the detained were members of a drug trafficking and money laundering network led by Jimenez (pictured), who was arrested in March.

The suspects include Judge Julio Cesar Ozuna, who has been charged with providing members of the criminal outfit with false identification cards. Karla Fariñas, sister of Nicaraguan Henry Fariñas -- the target of the attack that killed Cabral -- was also arrested.

Zavala said that police are working to discover the whereabouts of four more individuals linked to Jimenez.

InSight Crime Analysis

As with previous chapters in the Cabral case, the latest arrests serve to illustrate the transnational nature of organized crime in the region. Jimenez, a Costa Rican national, was arrested in Colombia on a boat which had set off from Panama. Officials claimed he had traveled to Colombia at the behest of Mexican kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, who instructed his contacts in Colombia's Rastrojos gang to protect Jimenez.

The arrest of Ozuna also points to organized crime's infiltration of political institutions in Nicaragua. Ozuna worked as a substitute judge on the Supreme Electoral Council, the organization tasked with overseeing elections in the country. His brother is the leader of the Liberal Constitutionalist Party, a right-wing opposition group. This demonstrates that, while Nicaragua may lack the kind of street crime and violence that characterizes other countries in Central America, it is by no means immune from corruption. A recent UNODC report documented the role that officials (both low and high-ranking) played in human trafficking in the country, while officials in the military have warned of corruption within its ranks.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

EL SALVADOR / 12 MAY 2017

In our May 11 Facebook Live discussion, Senior Investigator Héctor Silva Ávalos and Senior Editor Mike LaSusa spoke about InSight…

BRAZIL / 31 DEC 2015

Welcome to InSight Crime's Game Changers 2015, where we highlight the year's most important trends in organized crime in Latin…

ELITES AND CRIME / 2 FEB 2018

In our February 2 Facebook Live session, InSight Crime Co-director Steven Dudley and Managing Editor Josefina Salomón addressed the…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.