HomeNewsBriefPeru Weighs Proposal to Hike Military Budget, Double Number of Police
BRIEF

Peru Weighs Proposal to Hike Military Budget, Double Number of Police

PERU / 23 OCT 2012 BY HANNAH STONE EN

Challenged by a resurgent Shining Path rebel movement and increasing drug crops, Peru’s Congressional Defense Commission has set out plans for a 20 percent increase in the military and police budgets, and a doubling of the number of police officers.

Jose Urquizo Maggia, head of Congress’ Defense Commission, said that the police and armed forces suffer from budget shortfalls, lacking sufficient equipment. He suggested that mining taxes that are not spent by local governments could go towards making this up, reported La Republica.

Maggia’s proposal is that some 10 percent of the country’s budget next year go into defense: 11 billion soles ($4.2 billion), of which 6 billion would go to the Defense Ministry, and 5 billion to the Interior Ministry. Prime Minister Juan Jimenez announced in August that the military would receive a budget boost of 20 percent.

Another member of the committee said that the plan was to increase the number of police in the country from the current 33,000 up to 60,000 by 2016, La Republica reported.

InSight Crime Analysis

Budget shortfalls for the Peruvian security forces came sharply into focus after a disastrous mission to rescue 36 gas workers kidnapped by the Shining Path in April, which left five police officers and three soldiers dead. A policeman who spent 17 walking through the jungle to get help for his wounded companion, who was later found dead (see image, above), told the media that they had been using guns that dated from World War II, had insufficient ammunition, and had to communicate by cell phone because their radios did not work.

Another factor that could spur the government to accept an increase in the defense budget is a proposal to give the military a greater role in internal policing, which is currently being considered by Congress.

The security forces are currently caught in a battle against a resurgent Shining Path, which is carrying out attacks against companies operating in their territory, as well as against state agents. The VRAE region, where the rebels are based, is an inhospitable mixture of mountain and jungle which makes the job of soldiers and police difficult. It is here that coca crops are also concentrated, producing cocaine and money for the rebels.

Compartir icon icon icon

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Related Content

PERU / 20 SEP 2013

Peru has created a multi-agency counternarcotics force to be stationed at the country's airports, a move likely to improve both…

PERU / 8 DEC 2011

One faction of Peruvian guerrilla group the Shining Path has issued a call for dialogue with the government, but the…

PERU / 29 AUG 2016

Prosecutors in Peru say a criminal group co-opted police and judicial officials so that it could continue running its operations…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

We Have Updated Our Website

4 FEB 2021

Welcome to our new home page. We have revamped the site to create a better display and reader experience.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Events – Border Crime: The Northern Triangle and Tri-Border Area

ARGENTINA / 25 JAN 2021

Through several rounds of extensive field investigations, our researchers have analyzed and mapped out the main illicit economies and criminal groups present in 39 border departments spread across the six countries of study – the Northern Triangle trio of Guatemala, Honduras, and El…

BRIEF

InSight Crime’s ‘Memo Fantasma’ Investigation Wins Simón Bolívar National Journalism Prize

COLOMBIA / 20 NOV 2020

The staff at InSight Crime was awarded the prestigious Simón Bolívar national journalism prize in Colombia for its two-year investigation into the drug trafficker known as “Memo Fantasma,” which was…

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – From Uncovering Organized Crime to Finding What Works

COLOMBIA / 12 NOV 2020

This project began 10 years ago as an effort to address a problem: the lack of daily coverage, investigative stories and analysis of organized crime in the Americas. …

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – Ten Years of Investigating Organized Crime in the Americas

FEATURED / 2 NOV 2020

In early 2009, Steven Dudley was in Medellín, Colombia. His assignment: speak to a jailed paramilitary leader in the Itagui prison, just south of the city. Following his interview inside…