HomeNewsBriefPeru Rescues Over 200 'Trafficking Victims' from Brothels in Mining Region
BRIEF

Peru Rescues Over 200 'Trafficking Victims' from Brothels in Mining Region

HUMAN TRAFFICKING / 4 OCT 2011 BY JEANNA CULLINAN EN

Peruvian authorities rescued at least 234 women, many of whom had reportedly been trafficked, from brothels in the remote region of Madre de Dios, on the southeastern border with Brazil and Bolivia.

Police raided 60 brothels in and around Puerto Maldonado, capital of the Tambopata province, on Sunday, and arrested five alleged traffickers. Officials stated that 10 minors were among those rescued, the youngest of who is reportedly 13 years old.

Asociacion Hurayo, a Peruvian NGO operating in the region, estimates that as many as 400 adolescents and 1,200 adults are working as prostitutes in Madre de Dios.

Madre de Dios is home to a large informal gold mining sector, and authorities estimate that hundreds of Peruvians from poor, rural communities arrive daily to the area, which produces approximately a fifth of all gold in the country. Many of these are miners, usually men who arrive without their families.

Following the operation, the government announced plans to install a "permanent state presence" in regional capital Puerto Maldonado, to combat crimes like illegal mining and drug trafficking, as well as trafficking in humans.

Human trafficking networks in Peru often prey upon poor or indigenous communities in remote areas like the Amazon region, where victims are recruited and sent to work as forced laborers or prostitutes, often in cities on the Pacific coast and other urban destinations.

(See La Republica's video report, below.)

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BOLIVIA / 29 DEC 2022

The US is losing allies in Latin America just as production of cocaine, fentanyl, and other synthetic drugs is going…

CHILE / 16 NOV 2022

The capture of Tren de Aragua members will test if Peru and Chile’s prisons can hold this dangerous gang.

BOLIVIA / 20 APR 2021

An old associate of Pablo Escobar, who spent 27 years in prison in the United States, is behind bars once…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Escaping Barrio 18

27 JAN 2023

Last week, InSight Crime published an investigation charting the story of Desafío, a 28-year-old Barrio 18 gang member who is desperate to escape gang life. But there’s one problem: he’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

Europe Coverage Makes a Splash

20 JAN 2023

Last week, InSight Crime published an analysis of the role of Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport as an arrival hub for cocaine and methamphetamine from Mexico.  The article was picked up by…

THE ORGANIZATION

World Looks to InSight Crime for Mexico Expertise

13 JAN 2023

Our coverage of the arrest of Chapitos’ co-founder Ovidio Guzmán López in Mexico has received worldwide attention.In the UK, outlets including The Independent and BBC…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Shares Expertise with US State Department

16 DEC 2022

Last week, InSight Crime Co-founder Steven Dudley took part in the International Anti-Corruption Conference organized by the US State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, & Labor and…

THE ORGANIZATION

Immediate Response to US-Mexico Marijuana Investigation

9 DEC 2022

InSight Crime’s investigation into how the legalization of marijuana in many US states has changed Mexico’s criminal dynamics made a splash this week appearing on the front page of…