HomeNewsBriefPeru Slashes Police Leadership to Streamline Force
BRIEF

Peru Slashes Police Leadership to Streamline Force

PERU / 13 OCT 2011 BY HANNAH STONE EN

President Ollanta Humala's government continues its purge of Peru's police force, annoucing that some 3,500 officers will be removed over the next two years.

Security Minister Oscar Valdes set up a committee to examine the records of all officers and decide who would be dismissed, reports La Republica. The newspaper's sources say that this committee has received some 2,500 reports of misconduct, with accusations including fuel trafficking, drug trafficking, and kidnapping.

The dismissals are focused on high-ranking officials, as demonstrated by a set of graphs drawn up by La Republica (see below). Some 68 percent of all colonels are set to be dismissed, and 60 percent of majors.

The announcement follows recent news of a major shake-up in the highest level of the force, with the removal of the chief of police and 29 other generals, out of a total 45.

The government has pointed out that many of those being removed are not facing accusations of misconduct, but were chosen because they were older, or had failed to achieve promotion. Valdes told RPP Noticias that the idea of the reforms is to slim down the police command, creating a pyramid structure with fewer people at the top, in order to create a more effective force.

Humala took office in July, and has since then signalled his willingness to reform policy on crime and drugs by carrying out large-scale personnel changes.

peru_police_purge

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COCAINE / 5 JUL 2022

European-bound Peruvian cocaine is usually moved by foreign gangs. But now homegrown criminals are muscling in on the action.

PERU / 6 DEC 2022

Peru is taking steps to tackle the threat of Venezuelan mega-gang Tren de Aragua, and have recently captured 30 members…

CHILE / 25 AUG 2021

A series of seizures and drug raids across Latin America have revealed how previously niche high-strength marijuana products are establishing…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Escaping Barrio 18

27 JAN 2023

Last week, InSight Crime published an investigation charting the story of Desafío, a 28-year-old Barrio 18 gang member who is desperate to escape gang life. But there’s one problem: he’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

Europe Coverage Makes a Splash

20 JAN 2023

Last week, InSight Crime published an analysis of the role of Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport as an arrival hub for cocaine and methamphetamine from Mexico.  The article was picked up by…

THE ORGANIZATION

World Looks to InSight Crime for Mexico Expertise

13 JAN 2023

Our coverage of the arrest of Chapitos’ co-founder Ovidio Guzmán López in Mexico has received worldwide attention.In the UK, outlets including The Independent and BBC…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Shares Expertise with US State Department

16 DEC 2022

Last week, InSight Crime Co-founder Steven Dudley took part in the International Anti-Corruption Conference organized by the US State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, & Labor and…

THE ORGANIZATION

Immediate Response to US-Mexico Marijuana Investigation

9 DEC 2022

InSight Crime’s investigation into how the legalization of marijuana in many US states has changed Mexico’s criminal dynamics made a splash this week appearing on the front page of…