HomeNewsBriefPolice Seize Over 3.5 Tons of ‘Creepy’ Marijuana in Colombia
BRIEF

Police Seize Over 3.5 Tons of 'Creepy' Marijuana in Colombia

COLOMBIA / 16 FEB 2012 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

Police confiscated a 3.6 ton load of extra-potent marijuana in the southwest Valle del Cauca department, a plant which is becoming an increasingly big money-maker for armed groups.

The seized marijuana had an estimated value of $5.49 million, reports El Nuevo Herald. Police found the multi-ton load in a truck traveling between the town of Tulua to departmental capital Cali. It reportedly belonged to criminal group the Rastrojos, according to the report.  

InSight Crime Analysis

"Cripa" or "creepy" marijuana is a powerful strain bred from plants native to Europe and US. Compared to other types of marijuana, the "cripa" has up to 20 percent higher levels of THC, the active psychoactive ingredient in the plant. It also sells for much higher prices on the Colombian market, making it an attractive earner for groups like the Rastrojos. 

Much of Colombia's "cripa" trade is based in southwest departments like Cauca and Valle. The FARC's 6th Front, active in this area, is particularly dependent on the industry, running large industrial marijuana farms. 

The huge shipment seized by the police is partly an indication of just how easy it is for drug traffickers to supply marijuana to the domestic market. "Creepy" marijuana is still less lucrative than cocaine, meaning traffickers can afford to lose some of their shipments to interdiction, without their profits being too badly affected. 

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