HomeNewsBrief40% More Poppy Grown in Mexico than Marijuana: Govt
BRIEF

40% More Poppy Grown in Mexico than Marijuana: Govt

HEROIN / 3 APR 2013 BY MARGUERITE CAWLEY EN

The area of poppy crops eradicated in Mexico last year exceeded that of marijuana by 40 percent, according to official figures, indicating shifts in drug production and trafficking patterns.

Reports by Mexico's defense ministry show that in 2007, the area of marijuana destroyed was about 50 percent greater than that of poppy -- 22,965 hectares compared to 11,393 hectares. The gap began to close between 2008 and 2010, and by 2011, poppy eradication had overtaken marijuana crop eradication, with 16,301 hectares of poppy destroyed compared to 13,262 hectares of marijuana. 

This shift became more dramatic in 2012, with 8,670 hectares of marijuana and 14,347 hectares of poppy destroyed, making poppy crop destruction around 40 percent greater than that of marijuana.

A similar trend is reflected in the ministry's figures for kilos of marijuana and heroin seized during this time period, with marijuana seizures decreasing from 2,068 tons in 2007 to 1,145 tons in 2012 and heroin seizures rising from 124 kilos in 2007 to 3,716 kilos in 2012.

InSight Crime Analysis

Mexico supplies seven percent of the world's heroin, with the majority going to the United States, according to 2013 US State Department estimates. As previously reported by InSight Crime, governments' numbers regarding heroin production in Mexico do not match up, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions about trends.

However, 2011 reports that Mexican cartels have links to heroin distributors in numerous US cities indicate that the drug may have spread as a source of revenue. Marijuana, meanwhile, could make up as little as 15 percent of cartels' revenues, according to some estimates, and this may decrease as marijuana legalization moves forward in parts of the US.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

MEXICO / 16 OCT 2014

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto has put forward a plan to radically reshape the nation’s Justice Department, the latest example…

GUATEMALA / 3 JAN 2013

The Guatemalan military will deploy a special brigade to its northwestern border with Mexico, dedicated to combating the poppy trade,…

MEXICO / 31 AUG 2012

The murder of the mayor-elect of a small town in San Luis Potosi coincides with reports of infighting within the Zetas,…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…

THE ORGANIZATION

Backing Investigative Journalism Around the Globe

5 NOV 2021

InSight Crime was a proud supporter of this year's Global Investigative Journalism Conference, which took place November 1 through November 5 and convened nearly 2,000 journalists…

THE ORGANIZATION

Tracking Dirty Money and Tren de Aragua

29 OCT 2021

InSight Crime was delighted to support investigative reporting in the Americas through a workshop with our friends at Connectas, a non-profit journalism initiative that facilitates collaboration…