HomeNewsBriefSantos As Regional Player; The Tribulations of Mexico's Deported
BRIEF

Santos As Regional Player; The Tribulations of Mexico's Deported

COLOMBIA / 25 APR 2011 BY INSIGHT CRIME EN

Despite criticism from sectors of the previous Colombian administration, including former President Uribe, President Santos’ strategy of pursuing friendship with neighboring Ecuador and Venezuela seems to have paid off. It is no secret that Uribe had a stormy relationship with both President Chavez of Venezuela and Correa of Ecuador. Relations were broken with both countries, and re-established only after Santos took office in August 2010. Not only has Santos called Chavez his “new best friend,” he also decided to extradite a major drug kingpin to Caracas instead of Washington. This strategy of improving relations with Venezuela has borne fruit on several fronts: economically, with the re-establishment of bilateral trade, and in terms of security, with the signing of several cooperation agreements on drug trafficking. Venezuela has also, according to a statement by Santos, eradicated Colombian rebel encampments on its territory, and more recently captured Joaquin Perez, a Swedish nationalized citizen and alleged Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia - FARC) member. Ecuador has also captured a Colombian citizen who is suspected of being a member of a criminal band. Yesterday, Santos thanked both neighboring governments for their cooperation, reports TeleSUR, something that would have been unthinkable during Uribe's eight years in power.

  • Activists report on the threats faced by Mexican citizens repatriated from the U.S, as well as foreigners deported via Mexico. According to reports, these individuals, like migrants heading for the U.S. border, are now a target of kidnapping by organized crime syndicates. El Universal reports that they are often charged up to $6,000 in ransom. According to the National Migration Institute of Mexico (Instituto Nacional de Migracion – INM), there were some 66,700 such repatriation cases in the first two months of this year. The state most affected is Baja California, with 25,300 cases, or 37 percent of the total. The situation is exacerbated by the face that Mexico lacks the capacity to process all these people, while most of the deportations and expulsions happen during the night, and the individuals are given little help or instructions on how to proceed after they reach Mexico. Bodies of some of people who have been forced to return to Mexico have been found in so-called “narco-fosas,” or mass graves containing victims of drug violence.
  • Semana reports on the deteriorating security situation in Colombia. According to data from the Vice-Presidential Program for the Observation of Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law (Observatorio del Programa Presidencial de DDHH y DIH de la Vicepresidencia), between the first quarter of 2010 and the same period this year the number of massacre victims has risen, along with attacks on infrastructure. According to police reports twelve out of the country's 35 departments are under special surveillance, affecting 339 municipalities (30% of the more than 1,100). InSight considers that there is no immediate danger of a surge in violence as the numbers show only a slight increase relative to 2008 and 2009. However, InSight studies have found that urban security is a major concern, and all the indicators point to an increase in urban violence: homicide, microtrafficking, microextortion, and express kidnappings.
share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COLOMBIA / 10 MAR 2021

The central Colombian department of Antioquia has been the scene of four massacres over the first two months of 2021,…

AYOTZINAPA / 10 NOV 2014

The stunning, dramatic blow-by-blow account of what most likely happened to the 43 missing students in Guerrero is an indication…

COLOMBIA / 3 MAR 2021

Illegal loggers and land grabbers in Colombia have begun clearing small, isolated patches of forest to avoid being spotted from…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.