HomeNewsBriefReport on Honduras' Homemade Weapons Distracts from Main Sources
BRIEF

Report on Honduras' Homemade Weapons Distracts from Main Sources

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 8 SEP 2015 BY ELIJAH STEVENS EN

Authorities say increasingly modified and modernized handmade firearms have surfaced in Honduras, but the real problem remains the prevalence of illegal manufactured weapons throughout the country.

La Tribuna says says there has been an increase in modified "chimbas," crudely fabricated and illegal firearms, making them more modern and lethal. Agents from the Investigative Police (DPI) also told the newspaper that gang members “and other delinquents” are driving the trend.

An official from the General Directorate of Forensic Medicine (DGMF) added that the modernization of these weapons could be attributed to the collaboration of arms experts in their manufacturing, including former army and police forces.

InSight Crime Analysis

In a country with one of the highest homicide rates in the world, around 80 percent of which are committed using guns, reports of increasingly technological and powerful, homemade guns is a significant concern. But the real issue is the large-scale and fairly uninhibited circulation of manufactured weapons throughout Honduras. 

In 2014, a congressional commission estimated that there are over 700,00 unregistered guns in circulation, outnumbering legal firearms almost three to two. While homemade firearms make up a portion of these weapons, the majority of these illegal guns are trafficked from the United States, neighboring countries and through corrupt Honduran security forces.

The prevalence and access to manufactured guns makes it unlikely that gang members and others would turn to specializing in handmade chimbas. Chimbas are also labor intensive and are notoriously unreliable.

SEE ALSO: Honduras News and Profiles

There also appears to be some confusion in the article itself. La Tribuna says authorities have decommissioned 192 chimbas between January and August of 2015. Yet the graph at the bottom of the article says that only 27 chimbas were decommissioned during that time period, far less than La Tribuna's reported figure. In either case, these numbers are grossly overshadowed by the number of manufactured firearms decommissioned. (See below)

Decommissioned Arms in Honduras 

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COCA / 19 APR 2022

Coca farms and cocaine production camps are proliferating in Honduras, showing that the illicit crop has taken root in the…

EL SALVADOR / 4 APR 2016

Human Rights Watch has chronicled violent drivers of the continuing child migration crisis, as well as how the US…

GUATEMALA / 12 OCT 2011

As drug trafficking networks deepen their activities in Central America some analysts have expressed concern at the prospect of countries…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela Drug Trafficking Investigation and InDepth Gender Coverage

29 APR 2022

On May 4, InSight Crime will be publishing The Cocaine Revolution in Venezuela, a groundbreaking investigation into how the Venezuelan government regulates the cocaine trade in the country. An accompanying event,…

THE ORGANIZATION

InDepth Coverage of Juan Orlando Hernández

22 APR 2022

Ever since Juan Orlando Hernández was elected president of Honduras in 2014, InSight Crime has provided coverage of every twist and turn during his rollercoaster time in office, amid growing…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela's Cocaine Revolution

15 APR 2022

On May 4th, InSight Crime will publish a groundbreaking investigation on drug trafficking in Venezuela. A product of three years of field research across the country, the study uncovers cocaine production in…

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Widespread Coverage of InSight Crime MS13 Investigation

8 APR 2022

In a joint investigation with La Prensa Gráfica, InSight Crime recently revealed that four of the MS13’s foremost leaders had been quietly released from…

THE ORGANIZATION

Informing US State Department and European Union

1 APR 2022

InSight Crime Co-director McDermott briefed the US State Department and other international players on the presence of Colombian guerrillas in Venezuela and the implication this has for both nations.  McDermott…