HomeNewsBriefReport on Honduras' Homemade Weapons Distracts from Main Sources
BRIEF

Report on Honduras' Homemade Weapons Distracts from Main Sources

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 8 SEP 2015 BY ELIJAH STEVENS EN

Authorities say increasingly modified and modernized handmade firearms have surfaced in Honduras, but the real problem remains the prevalence of illegal manufactured weapons throughout the country.

La Tribuna says says there has been an increase in modified "chimbas," crudely fabricated and illegal firearms, making them more modern and lethal. Agents from the Investigative Police (DPI) also told the newspaper that gang members “and other delinquents” are driving the trend.

An official from the General Directorate of Forensic Medicine (DGMF) added that the modernization of these weapons could be attributed to the collaboration of arms experts in their manufacturing, including former army and police forces.

InSight Crime Analysis

In a country with one of the highest homicide rates in the world, around 80 percent of which are committed using guns, reports of increasingly technological and powerful, homemade guns is a significant concern. But the real issue is the large-scale and fairly uninhibited circulation of manufactured weapons throughout Honduras. 

In 2014, a congressional commission estimated that there are over 700,00 unregistered guns in circulation, outnumbering legal firearms almost three to two. While homemade firearms make up a portion of these weapons, the majority of these illegal guns are trafficked from the United States, neighboring countries and through corrupt Honduran security forces.

The prevalence and access to manufactured guns makes it unlikely that gang members and others would turn to specializing in handmade chimbas. Chimbas are also labor intensive and are notoriously unreliable.

SEE ALSO: Honduras News and Profiles

There also appears to be some confusion in the article itself. La Tribuna says authorities have decommissioned 192 chimbas between January and August of 2015. Yet the graph at the bottom of the article says that only 27 chimbas were decommissioned during that time period, far less than La Tribuna's reported figure. In either case, these numbers are grossly overshadowed by the number of manufactured firearms decommissioned. (See below)

Decommissioned Arms in Honduras 

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

HONDURAS / 21 MAY 2012

Despite mounting criticism of US security efforts in Honduras in the wake of a controversial operation which killed four people,…

ELITES AND CRIME / 7 MAY 2013

In Honduras, two high-profile killings have raised the question of whether criminal actors are waging a war against the government,…

ECUADOR / 19 JUL 2012

Ecuador's government has reported the existence of 26 unsanctioned border crossings into Colombia, which pose a security problem to both…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.