HomeNewsBriefUN: Mexican Government Participated in Disappearances
BRIEF

UN: Mexican Government Participated in Disappearances

MEXICO / 9 MAR 2012 BY TATIANA FARAMARZI EN

The United Nations issued strong words on Tuesday, stating that the Mexican state has participated in the kidnapping and disappearance of Mexican citizens. But determining just how many have vanished due to alleged government complicity is impossible to track, given that the government keeps wildly different counts of the total number of missing.

The UN·Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID) based its recent comments on a March 2011 trip to Mexico, when the UN·met with numerous authorities at the state and federal levels, as well as international NGOs, relatives of disappeared persons, and former victims of enforced disappearance.

Presenting its findings in Geneva, the Group said that state bodies have been involved in the disappearance of Mexican citizens, adding that while organized crime groups did commit a large number of kidnappings and disappearances, they were not responsible for all cases.

The WGEID said that the number of denouncements of disappearances increased from four in 2006 to 77 in 2010. These are markedly different numbers kept by Mexico's National Human Rights Commission, which reported 346 denouncements in 2010.

Amnesty International also condemned Mexico's "official inaction," stating that the government has done little to investigate military and police accused of playing a role in some disappearances.

InSight Crime Analysis

According to Animal Político, Mexico's federal institutions keep a conflicted track of the number of·persons reported disappeared. While the Attorney General's Office counts 4,800 disappearances, the Attorney General's Office of Mexico City records the total number of missing people at 5,229. In contrast, the Secretariat of Public Security (SSP), which is legally responsible for updating the national register of missing persons, has documented 2,044 cases.

The discrepancy in official statistics only serves to underscore the state's inability to accurately measure the problem. It also points to the difficulty in categorizing disappearances. There are those killed in the drug war, those who may fall victim to kidnapping or sex trafficking rings, and those victim to "forced disappearances" carried out by the Mexican security forces. Considering the apparent difficulty in measuring the total number of disappeared in Mexico, accurately measuring those who have disappeared due to the involvement of state agencies seems near impossible.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

EL CHAPO / 27 JAN 2017

US prosecutors have filed a memorandum detailing the lengthy criminal career of recently extradited Mexico drug lord Joaquín "El Chapo"…

MEXICO / 22 APR 2019

Angry street vendors in Mexico City are threatening to form self-defense groups if authorities can't stop the activities of a…

MEXICO / 28 SEP 2011

Examples of vigilante groups abound in Mexico, but all have been short-lived, and their emergence appears to have little to…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…