HomeNewsBriefUS Sets Out Anti-Crime Aid for Honduras, Following Drug Reform Conference
BRIEF

US Sets Out Anti-Crime Aid for Honduras, Following Drug Reform Conference

CARSI / 27 MAR 2012 BY EDWARD FOX EN

US Assistant Secretary of State William Brownfield has announced a package of programs to combat crime and drug trafficking in Honduras, as part of a tour aimed to bring "concrete" anti-crime plans to the region.

The assistant secretary of state for international narcotics and law enforcement arrived in Honduras Sunday, and will travel to Guatemala on Tuesday.

In Tegucigalpa he signed an agreement with President Porfirio Lobo to donate $2.2 million to anti-gang programs in Honduras via the Central American Regional Security Initiative (CARSI). This includes the introduction of community policing techniques, and programs to provide training to young people, to get them into work and out of gangs.

Some of these funds will go to a police Model Precinct Program being launched in the capital's San Miguel neighborhood. This program involves trying to "overhaul" the operations of the police station, with training and random vetting of officers, according to the US Embassy.

Brownfield attended the presentation of 30 motorbikes to Honduras' police force, many to be used by the San Miguel force, reports El Heraldo.

Brownfield told local media that he was "optimistic" about bilateral cooperation with Honduras, and that "it will produce, in the not too distant future, strong institutions that make drug traffickers look for other routes."

InSight Crime Analysis

Brownfield announced his trip to the region earlier this month, saying that he would meet with representatives of Central American governments to discuss "concrete and specific" programs to cut crime. His words suggested that the US was responding to frustration among Central America's leaders with US action against drug trafficking in the region, saying that the governments of El Salvador, Guatmala and Honduras “have all the right in the world to tell the international community that the time for talks has passed, the time for action is here.”

This seems to be, in part, a response to recent moves by Guatemalan President Otto Perez to bring the issue of drug legalization to the table.

On his arrival in Honduras, Brownfield said that Perez's proposals on drug liberalization would "not work" to combat organized crime.

Brownfield's visit come days after Perez held a conference on drug reform, which Lobo and Salvador's Mauricio Funes both backed out of at the last minute. At the conference, Perez fielded various proposals which suggested his desire for more US aid to the region. As well as controversial proposals on decriminalizing drugs, he suggested that the US start compensating governments for every kilo of cocaine seized in the region.

The State Department has asked Congress for $107 million for the region via CARSI in financial year 2013.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

EXTORTION / 26 APR 2013

Tegucigalpa residents say that police work with gangs that go door-to-door to collect extortion fees of nearly $80 per month,…

DISPLACEMENT / 22 MAY 2014

The United States is seeing a flood of migrants -- many of them unaccompanied children -- from Central America, despite…

HONDURAS / 12 MAR 2012

Officials in Honduras have discovered more than 60 hidden airfields in four eastern provinces, which drug traffickers use to smuggle…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…