HomeNewsAnalysisMurders Will Continue to Drop in Colombian Capital Bogota: Report
ANALYSIS

Murders Will Continue to Drop in Colombian Capital Bogota: Report

COLOMBIA / 10 FEB 2013 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

A study examining the history of crime networks in Colombia's capital, Bogota, predicted that the pacification of the city will continue and that homicide levels are unlikely to ever reach the peaks seen in the mid-1990s. 

The report, released by Bogota-based think-tank Fundacion Ideas Para la Paz (FIP) in January, concluded that the state has "essentially" established control over the city's most violent areas, in both the center and periphery. It is unlikely that homicide rates will increase significantly in the future unless some powerful outsider group, on par with the Medellin Cartel, attempts to take control of the Bogota underworld, the report stated. 

(Disclaimer: until 2012, the FIP was InSight Crime's partner organization). 

The bulk of the report outlines the history of organized crime in Bogota, dating back to the 1980s and 1990s, when dozens of neighborhoods were controlled by guerrilla militias, such as the National Liberation Army (ELN), Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), and M-19. Several of the organized crime networks in the city were controlled by the Medellin Cartel, which allied itself with a bloc of powerful emerald traders.

The city's most violent year on record was 1993, with nearly 81 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants. Since then, homicides have continued to decrease overall, asides from certain key years which did see a rise in violence. One such period was between 2004 to 2005, when two rival paramilitary blocs of the United Self Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) were fighting one another. The murder rate in Bogota currently stands at 16 per 100,000.

The report goes on to break down crime dynamics neighborhood by neighborhood, noting that the center of the city has traditionally been controlled by paramilitary and drug trafficking groups, and that the most prevalent crimes are car theft and robbery. Peripheral neighborhoods, once controlled by guerrilla militias, suffer more from violence connected to the microtrafficking trade and rivalries between local street gangs. 

Bogota's most violent years coincided with periods in which firearms were used to commit the majority of homicides, the report notes. During the first eleven months of 2012, homicides dropped 22 percent, giving Bogota one of its most peaceful years in three decades, an improvement that some attributed to the temporary ban on firearms passed by the mayor's office

InSight Crime Analysis

While Bogota's homicide rates are unlikely to increase to the same levels as the 1990s, the city's security gains have not yet been consolidated. Rivalries over the local distribution of drugs still has significant potential to cause violence, as seen in January, when five alleged members of a street gang were gunned down, the first time in six years that five people were killed in a single act, according to the FIP

Another question is whether law enforcement efforts to break up the traditional microtrafficking networks could lead to more violence. Last year the police made efforts towards clearing out Bogota's traditional microtrafficking hub, an area known as El Bronx, which is rife with crack dens and drug distribution points. As Bogota's law enforcement continue to target the nerve centers of the drug trade, this could cause greater uncertainty in the criminal underworld if drug distribution centers relocate to different parts of the city, rather than being concentrated in a single place. 

Despite these uncertainties, security overall is improving in Colombia's traffic-clogged capital. Police say that robberies are decreasing, down by as much as 30 percent. That doesn't mean that Bogota still doesn't have serious problems with petty crime. Police statistics note that on average, a motorcycle is reported stolen every five hours; while Bogota's judicial police report that during the first half of 2012, 1,165 cell phones were reported stolen.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COLOMBIA / 11 SEP 2013

A high-profile drug trafficker with familial ties to Alvaro Uribe has pleaded guilty to drug trafficking in the United States,…

COLOMBIA / 25 JUL 2011

Colombian authorities have confirmed that Angel de Jesus Pacheco, alias "Sebastian," a commander of drug gang the…

COCAINE / 13 APR 2022

The arrest of yet another alleged Sinaloa Cartel emissary in Colombia has once again raised questions about the extent of…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Environmental and Academic Praise

17 JUN 2022

InSight Crime’s six-part series on the plunder of the Peruvian Amazon continues to inform the debate on environmental security in the region. Our Environmental Crimes Project Manager, María Fernanda Ramírez,…

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Series on Plunder of Peru’s Amazon Makes Headlines

10 JUN 2022

Since launching on June 2, InSight Crime’s six-part series on environmental crime in Peru’s Amazon has been well-received. Detailing the shocking impunity enjoyed by those plundering the rainforest, the investigation…

THE ORGANIZATION

Duarte’s Death Makes Waves

3 JUN 2022

The announcement of the death of Gentil Duarte, one of the top dissident commanders of the defunct Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), continues to reverberate in Venezuela and Colombia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Cattle Trafficking Acclaim, Investigation into Peru’s Amazon 

27 MAY 2022

On May 18, InSight Crime launched its most recent investigation into cattle trafficking between Central America and Mexico. It showed precisely how beef, illicitly produced in Honduras, Guatemala…

THE ORGANIZATION

Coverage of Fallen Paraguay Prosecutor Makes Headlines

20 MAY 2022

The murder of leading anti-crime prosecutor, Marcelo Pecci, while on honeymoon in Colombia, has drawn attention to the evolution of organized crime in Paraguay. While 17 people have been arrested…