HomeNewsBrief41 Children Go Missing Each Day in Mexico: NGO
BRIEF

41 Children Go Missing Each Day in Mexico: NGO

HUMAN TRAFFICKING / 22 AUG 2011 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

According to a Mexican non-profit organization, the Attorney General's Office has registered 75,000 minors as missing since 2006, many of them likely sold to sex trafficking rings.

The National Foundation for Investigations into Stolen and Disappeared Children (Fundacion Nacional de Investigaciones de Niños Robados y Desaparecidos) says that an average of 41 children a day have been reported missing over the past five years. Only one in 10 cases handled by the foundation end with the child being rescued, the organization's spokeswoman said. According to data from Mexico's Attorney General's Office, 30,000 of the 75,000 children reported missing have been rescued.

According to a report prepared last year for the United Nations, up to 35,000 minors have been recruited by drug trafficking gangs since 2006. Under Mexican law, minors cannot serve prison sentences longer than three years, which may explain why some gangs have turned to recruiting teen hitmen, including 14-year-old Edgar Jimenez, alias "El Ponchis," a U.S. citizen charged with kidnapping and homicide in July.

Minors are also recruited into the sex trade. Many of Mexico's missing women and girls may be working in forced prostitution, the foundation notes. According to a report published last year by the Council on Hemispheric Affairs, the focus on the war against drug trafficking has forced some gangs to broaden their criminal portfolio and begin seeking profits from human and sex trafficking.

Other agencies besides the Attorney General's Office have tracked the negative impact of Mexico's so-called "drug war" on the youth population. According to Mexico's Minister of Education, 30 percent of the homicides connected to organized crime involve minors.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

HOMICIDES / 7 APR 2016

For those of us preoccupied with the study of crime in Mexico, there is one great frustration. That official statistics…

ELITES AND CRIME / 29 APR 2014

Authorities in Mexico have arrested the mayor of Michoacan's principal port city for alleged Knights Templar ties, in an illustration…

MEXICO / 2 FEB 2012

Three towns in Mexico have lost large portions of their residents in recent years, as locals fled worsening violence at…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…