HomeNewsBriefAnonymous Launch Cyber Attacks Targeting Mexican Government
BRIEF

Anonymous Launch Cyber Attacks Targeting Mexican Government

CYBERCRIME / 18 JAN 2013 BY JAMES BARGENT EN

Hacker collective "Anonymous" launched a series of cyberattacks against websites belonging to Mexico's security agencies and claim to have stolen files from the Secretariat of National Defense (SEDENA).

Communicating via their Twitter account, Anonymous announced they had managed to take offline the websites of SEDENA, as well as the Secretariat of the Navy (SEMAR), and the Center for Investigation and National Security (CISEN). On the SEDENA site, the group reportedly managed to post a Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) manifesto that remained for two hours, according to the AFP.

In another tweet, the collective claimed to have stolen the entire content of SEDENA's server and that they would soon release the information. The group added that "the surprises will continue."

SEDENA responded with a short statement saying their website was down but internal information and communication systems were working normally, reported Informador. The statement made no mention of Anonymous or of whether any files had been taken.

SEMAR also responded to the hack, acknowledging they had been the victims of a Denial-of-Service attack (DoS). However, they added, internal systems were functioning normally and there was “no damage to naval operations or national security.”

InSight Crime Analysis

Anonymous collectives elsewhere in Latin America, such as Colombia, have launched cyber attacks on government websites. In Mexico, alleged members of the group entered into a dispute with the Zetas drug cartel in 2011, threatening to expose collaborators of the gang. The group later backed down from the threat over security fears.

Although this is not the first time Anonymous activists have attacked government targets in Mexico, previously bringing down a mining ministry-affiliated website, the decision to take on government security institutions could represent a change of focus for the group. However, as Anonymous is an amorphous collective with no official leadership or hierarchy, it could also be a decision taken by one faction acting in isolation.

Any targeting of security agencies will concern the Mexican government and if it is true that Anonymous have stolen information from Sedena, then this could pose a threat both to national security and to individuals working in the organization.

The attack also highlights how 2012's continent wide crackdown on alleged Anonymous activists had little affect on the groups operational capability.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

FENTANYL / 16 NOV 2022

Mexico’s two most powerful organized crime groups are reportedly sourcing precursor chemicals from the same suppliers to produce fentanyl.

ARGENTINA / 1 FEB 2022

In 2021, most countries in Latin America and the Caribbean experienced a marked increase in murders. Resurgent violence was to…

FENTANYL / 14 JUL 2022

An announcement by the Mexican government about the largest seizure of illegal fentanyl in the country's history appeared to ignore…

About InSight Crime

WORK WITH US

Open Position: Full Stack WordPress Developer

28 NOV 2022

As Full Stack WordPress Developer You Will: Work collaboratively with other developers and designers to maintain and improve organizational standards.Demonstrate a high level of attention to detail, and implement best…

THE ORGANIZATION

Join Us This #GivingTuesday in Exposing Organized Crime

24 NOV 2022

For over twelve years, InSight Crime has contributed to the global dialogue on organized crime and corruption. Our work has provided policymakers, analysts, academics, journalists, and the general public with…

THE ORGANIZATION

Like Crime, Our Coverage Knows No Borders

18 NOV 2022

The nature of global organized crime means that while InSight Crime focuses on Latin America, we also follow criminal dynamics worldwide. InSight Crime investigator Alessandro Ford covers the connections between Latin American and European…

THE ORGANIZATION

Using Data to Expose Crime

11 NOV 2022

Co-director Jeremy McDermott made a virtual presentation at a conference hosted by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). The ‘Sixth International Conference on Governance, Crime, and Justice…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime ON AIR

4 NOV 2022

InSight Crime Co-director Steven Dudley was interviewed for the podcast The Rosenberg Case: A Tale of Murder, Corruption, and Conspiracy in Guatemala, which explores the potential involvement of then president, Álvaro Colom,…