HomeNewsBriefOverhaul of Argentina Security Policy Leaves Unanswered Questions
BRIEF

Overhaul of Argentina Security Policy Leaves Unanswered Questions

ARGENTINA / 4 APR 2017 BY DAVID GAGNE EN

Authorities in Argentina are reshaping security policies by putting more emphasis on information sharing and data-driven policing, an approach that could pay major dividends, although there are questions about how it will be implemented. 

Argentina's Security Ministry plans to restructure the federal security forces in order to better equip them with the tools required to combat organized crime activities such as trafficking of drugs, persons and arms as well as terrorism, reported Infobae.

The strategy seeks to establish greater information sharing among the federal forces so that they can identify criminal patterns before they develop. 

Along those same lines, authorities are planning to open more lines of communication between the security and intelligence agencies. They are also creating a new agency that will coordinate state responses to cyber crime. 

Meanwhile, police in the capital city of Buenos Aires are looking to compile data about suspects onto a single platform so that all the information is at the officers' fingertips when they arrive at a crime scene, reported the Financial Times. They also plan to use data to predict where crimes are most likely to occur. 

"We can be ahead of what could happen," said Martín Ocampo, the minister of justice and security in Buenos Aires. "With predictive analytics, we want to make it so hard to commit a crime in the city that criminals will not do it."

InSight Crime Analysis

Understanding how criminal groups operate and coordinate activities with other networks is a central component to combating organized crime, so on the surface the government's plan appears promising. But given the lack of concrete details about how the authorities plan to facilitate interagency cooperation, this may not amount to much more than a reshuffling of the bureaucratic deck. It is telling that the government announced almost a year ago a similar campaign to generate greater intelligence in order to better investigate and dismantle organized crime groups. 

SEE ALSO: Coverage of Argentina

Other sweeping changes to Argentina's security policy have failed to live up to their expectations. For example, President Mauricio Macri authorized the armed forces to shoot down suspected drug plans in January 2016, but last November officials said 40 such planes coming from Bolivia land in Argentina every day. 

The plan to integrate more data into policing in Buenos Aires, while still in the conceptual stage, is more likely to have a tangible impact on security. Police forces in countries across Latin America have been experimenting for years with technology and mapping data to determine where and when crimes are most often committed. These examples provide a wealth of information for the program's designers in Buenos Aires to draw upon. 

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

ARGENTINA / 3 AUG 2020

Authorities in Argentina have implicated local police and prosecutors in an illegal gambling and extortion ring linked to the infamous…

MEXICO / 11 FEB 2019

Two death threats were made against the president of Mexico in the same week from two different criminal groups, suggesting…

CARIBBEAN / 23 MAY 2017

The Caribbean region has a "uniquely high level of violent crime," according to a new report that offers…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela's Cocaine Revolution Met With Uproar

6 MAY 2022

On May 4, InSight Crime launched its latest investigation, Venezuela’s Cocaine Revolution¸ accompanied by a virtual panel on its findings. The takeaways from this three-year effort, including the fact that Venezuela…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela Drug Trafficking Investigation and InDepth Gender Coverage

29 APR 2022

On May 4, InSight Crime will be publishing The Cocaine Revolution in Venezuela, a groundbreaking investigation into how the Venezuelan government regulates the cocaine trade in the country. An accompanying event,…

THE ORGANIZATION

InDepth Coverage of Juan Orlando Hernández

22 APR 2022

Ever since Juan Orlando Hernández was elected president of Honduras in 2014, InSight Crime has provided coverage of every twist and turn during his rollercoaster time in office, amid growing…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela's Cocaine Revolution

15 APR 2022

On May 4th, InSight Crime will publish a groundbreaking investigation on drug trafficking in Venezuela. A product of three years of field research across the country, the study uncovers cocaine production in…

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Widespread Coverage of InSight Crime MS13 Investigation

8 APR 2022

In a joint investigation with La Prensa Gráfica, InSight Crime recently revealed that four of the MS13’s foremost leaders had been quietly released from…