HomeNewsBriefAt Least 4 Top Honduras Cops Lead Drug Trafficking Rings: NGO
BRIEF

At Least 4 Top Honduras Cops Lead Drug Trafficking Rings: NGO

HONDURAS / 29 JAN 2014 BY CHARLES PARKINSON EN

A representative from a leading NGO in Honduras says at least four high-ranking police officials head drug trafficking organizations, a claim that underscores the depth of police corruption and the difficulty of the job facing the country's new president.

Josue Murillo, coordinator of the Alliance for Peace and Justice (APJ) -- an umbrella group of Honduran NGOs that advocates for security and justice reform -- claimed four or five leading officials were involved in the drug trade and ran small criminal groups of corrupt officers operating within the national police. He also said that fear and collusion from within the police prevented investigation into the matter, reported El Heraldo.

SEE ALSO: Honduras News and Profiles

"Those who have led and are leading the national police are responsible for the organized crime and drug trafficking that has penetrated the core of the Honduran national police," said Murillo.

Murillo's claims emerged at the same time it was announced three high-ranking national police officers were under investigation for $7.4 million of property in their possession, a value inconsistent with their incomes.

InSight Crime Analysis

The infiltration of organized crime into the Honduran police is well-documented. In mid-2013, 1,400 officers from the Criminal Investigation Unit (DNIC) were suspended on suspicions of such links. Despite millions of dollars spent in an ongoing effort to clean up the force, little progress has been made.

The accusation that high-level officials lead drug rings highlights a major obstacle to implementing effective reform in the country: Honduran police not only take bribes from criminals -- as is common in the region -- but actively participate in organized crime. Corruption and illicit activity also goes up to the highest levels of the force, with the country's recently dismissed police chief previously accused of involvement in death squads.

In the face of a deeply corrupt and ineffective police force, the previous administration frequently resorted to using the military to fight crime. Recently inaugurated President Juan Orlando Hernandez seems set to follow this track, sending military police to the streets of the capital as one of his first acts of leadership.

However, this tactic raises human rights concerns and is not ultimately a solution to the problem of institutional flaws that allow crime to proliferate. Whether Hernandez will demonstrate the necessary political will to implement effective police reform remains to be seen.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

CARIBBEAN / 22 SEP 2011

Honduras’ security and defense ministers met with their Jamaican counterparts in Tegucigalpa to sign a pact strengthening security cooperation as…

BRAZIL / 29 JUN 2017

Faced by the public defenders of a youth court in São Paulo, Brazil, Gorete emotionally explained what happened on the…

HONDURAS / 13 APR 2011

Chief of the U.S. Southern Command, General Douglas M. Fraser, started a two-day visit to Honduras on Tuesday. He will…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.