HomeNewsBriefBolivia Expelled US Drug Agency for 'Spying on President's Girlfriends'
BRIEF

Bolivia Expelled US Drug Agency for 'Spying on President's Girlfriends'

BOLIVIA / 8 SEP 2011 BY RONAN GRAHAM EN

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was expelled from a Bolivian coca region in 2008 for spying on President Evo Morales’s private life, according to a cable released by WikiLeaks.

According to the leaked cable, Bolivian "drug czar" Felipe Caceres met with U.S. representatives after Bolivia had expelled DEA agents from the coca-growing Chapare region and had declared the U.S. ambassador persona non grata.

Caceres reportedly told the U.S. officials that the expulsion "had to happen because President Morales was 'upset that the DEA is following him, especially when he visits his girlfriends.'"

The minister said he knew that the allegations were not true, but that individuals including Presidency Minister Ramon Quintana had been suggesting the idea to Morales, knowing "what buttons to push" to upset him.

Morales, who has never been married, announced the indefinite suspension of DEA operations in Bolivia two months later. He accused the DEA of conducting “espionage” and “conspiracy” against his government.

The Morales government has denied the version of events recounted in the cable, and challenged the authenticity of the documents.

President Evo Morales has continued to accuse the DEA of attempting to control the drug trade for its own ends.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BOLIVIA / 25 JUL 2014

Recent targeted assassinations coupled with the capture of the alleged Colombian leader of a drug trafficking group linked to payback…

BOLIVIA / 26 FEB 2014

Authorities in Bolivia have arrested a group of kidnappers that hacked computers to gain information on victims and demanded exorbitant…

BOLIVIA / 17 SEP 2012

After being blacklisted by the US for failing in its counternarcotics efforts, the latest UNODC report shows Bolivia's coca production…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.

THE ORGANIZATION

Series on Environmental Crime in the Amazon Generates Headlines

17 SEP 2021

InSight Crime and the Igarapé Institute have been delighted at the response to our joint investigation into environmental crimes in the Colombian Amazon. Coverage of our chapters dedicated to illegal mining…