HomeNewsBriefShootouts, Prison Break Draw Attention to Normally Calm Mexican Border State
BRIEF

Shootouts, Prison Break Draw Attention to Normally Calm Mexican Border State

MEXICO / 27 SEP 2012 BY CLAIRE O NEILL MCCLESKEY EN

The Mexican government has promised to send more troops to Coahuila, where some 130 inmates recently escaped from prison, and heavy clashes between criminals and the security forces have been reported.

Mexican Marines engaged in shootouts with criminals in the Coahuila municipality of Piedras Negras on the night of September 26, causing panic among inhabitants, according to El Universal. The municipality was the site of the escape of some 130 prisoners from prison earlier this month.

Meanwhile, Coahuila Governor Ruben Moreira responded to President Felipe Calderon's criticisms of the escape, pointing out that more than 1,600 people had disappeared in Coahuila due to organized crime, reported Proceso. He quoted the same figure in January, saying that there were 1,658 disappeared -- 1,113 men and 545 women.

On September 25, Mexican Interior Minister Alejandro Poire traveled to Coahuila along with other representatives of the federal government to meet with state officials to discuss security. Poire pledged to increase the number of federal forces in Coahuila, according to Vanguardia.

InSight Crime Analysis

The turmoil in Coahuila draws attention to the shifting security situation in this normally relatively calm state.

Though Coahuila is nowhere near as violent as other border states -- neighboring Chihuahua has a rate of 131 homicides per 100,000 people -- the rate of violence has climbed dramatically in recent years. In 2008 the state registered a homicide rate of just 6.8 per 100,000 inhabitants. This shot up to 33.9 per 100,00 in 2011, with homicides increasing 62 percent between 2010 and 2011, according to the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI).

Mexico's National Commission on Human Rights (CNDH) reported that between 2006 and April last year nearly 5,400 people went missing in the country. If Moreira's figure of 1,600 is accurate, and dates from a similar period, that would mean 30 percent of all disappearances since 2006 took place in Coahuila.

The promise to send more federal forces to Coahuila comes after it received some of the 15,000 troops who were deployed to seven states in August. The state is a key area of Zetas operations, and Mexican journalist Jorge Fernandez Menendez has reported that the repercussions of the split in that group can be felt in Coahuila.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

GULF CARTEL / 24 NOV 2020

Officials in Mexico City have launched a new program which will seek to impede criminal networks from recruiting minors across…

ECUADOR / 16 NOV 2021

After yet another prison massacre, Ecuadorean authorities have doubled down on Mexico’s two biggest cartels being behind gang warfare in…

ELITES AND CRIME / 30 SEP 2021

Evidence and accusations are piling up against Mexico's former top security official Genaro García Luna, as US prosecutors proffer new…

About InSight Crime

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Extensive Coverage of our Chronicles of a Cartel Bodyguard

23 SEP 2022

Our recent investigation, A Cartel Bodyguard in Mexico’s 'Hot Land', has received extensive media coverage.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime, American University Host Illegal Fishing Panel

19 SEP 2022

InSight Crime and the Center for Latin American & Latino Studies (CLALS) at American University discussed the findings of a joint investigation on IUU fishing at a September 9 conference.

THE ORGANIZATION

Impact on the Media Landscape

9 SEP 2022

InSight Crime’s first investigation on the Dominican Republic made an immediate impact on the Dominican media landscape, with major news outlets republishing and reprinting our findings, including in …

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Sharpens Its Skills

2 SEP 2022

Last week, the InSight Crime team gathered for our annual retreat in Colombia, where we discussed our vision and strategy for the next 12 months.  During the week, we also learned how to…

THE ORGANIZATION

Colombia’s Fragile Path to Peace Begins to Take Shape

26 AUG 2022

InSight Crime is charting the progress of President Gustavo Petro’s agenda as he looks to revolutionize Colombia’s security policy, opening dialogue with guerrillas, reforming the military and police, and…