HomeNewsBriefColombia Captures Cocaine Fixer ‘La Faraona’
BRIEF

Colombia Captures Cocaine Fixer ‘La Faraona’

COLOMBIA / 6 JUL 2015 BY ARRON DAUGHERTY EN

A recent capture by Colombian authorities highlights the importance of “super fixers” in modern drug trafficking and the perceived novelty of women in the drug trade.

Authorities arrested Magaly Chavez Ante, alias “La Faraona,” who allegedly coordinated boat shipments of cocaine moving from Ecuador and Colombia’s Pacific coast to the United States, local media reported. 

Chavez lived in Ecuador but was captured in Colombia’s third-largest city, Cali. She reportedly traveled to Colombia to meet with drug trafficking associates who had been threatened by Mexico’s Sinaloa drug cartel. 

According to newspaper El Tiempo, Chavez and a group of Colombian operatives had been tasked with supplying the Mexican group with 500 kilos of cocaine a week. However, the Sinaloans began threatening their Colombian partners, after multiple drug shipments were confiscated on routes Chavez had assured were safe. 

The 45-year-old Chavez reportedly began her criminal career in her native city of Buenaventura, on Colombia’s Pacific coast. She coordinated drug shipments for Colombia drug cartel the Rastrojos before moving to Haiti in 1998, to coordinate cocaine smuggling through the Caribbean. Following Haiti’s 2010 earthquake, Chavez settled in Ecuador under a fake identity, where she allegedly resumed facilitating drug shipments moved via Pacific routes. 

Her alias — “The Pharaoh” in English — came from her ability to form partnerships with multiple criminal groups simultaneously, including sometimes enemies the Rastrojos and the Urabeños, Colombian police were quoted as saying. 

The United States has an open extradition request for Chavez. 

InSight Crime Analysis

Chavez appears to have made a career out of being the perfect intermediary. After the downfall of numerous cocaine empires in Colombia and other nations, drug traffickers have largely reorganized into smaller groups that specialized in a single aspect of the trade. This has created a niche for people like Chavez who can coordinate between these groups, a role that crime analyst Doug Farah has dubbed “super fixers.” 

With numerous cartel heads throughout Latin America dead or behind bars, governments in the region may find targeting these “super fixers” a more effective strategy than the so-called “Kingpin” approach

Chavez’s arrest also drew significant media attention in Colombia, part of which is due to public fascination with female criminals in what is seen as a male-dominated industry. As Chavez’ case develops, it may yet see the same sensationalism generated by similar figures like Mexico’s “Narco-mom,” or Colombia’s “Cocaine Queen.” However, not only are there plenty of cases of women who have played important roles in Latin America’s transnational drug trade, but women also carry out key tasks for the region’s street gangs as well. 

 

Caracol Video Report on La Faraona

 

Compartir icon icon icon

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Related Content

COLOMBIA / 11 FEB 2011

Members of one of the most militarized drug-trafficking groups in Colombia are now being recruited by the Revolutionary Armed Forces…

COLOMBIA / 6 MAY 2014

Authorities in Colombia have reported an 18 percent drop in national homicides in the first four months of 2014, while…

HONDURAS / 10 APR 2013

The US Treasury has added an aspiring congressman in Honduras to its "Kingpin" list in what is likely an attempt…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

We Have Updated Our Website

4 FEB 2021

Welcome to our new home page. We have revamped the site to create a better display and reader experience.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Events – Border Crime: The Northern Triangle and Tri-Border Area

ARGENTINA / 25 JAN 2021

Through several rounds of extensive field investigations, our researchers have analyzed and mapped out the main illicit economies and criminal groups present in 39 border departments spread across the six countries of study – the Northern Triangle trio of Guatemala, Honduras, and El…

BRIEF

InSight Crime’s ‘Memo Fantasma’ Investigation Wins Simón Bolívar National Journalism Prize

COLOMBIA / 20 NOV 2020

The staff at InSight Crime was awarded the prestigious Simón Bolívar national journalism prize in Colombia for its two-year investigation into the drug trafficker known as “Memo Fantasma,” which was…

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – From Uncovering Organized Crime to Finding What Works

COLOMBIA / 12 NOV 2020

This project began 10 years ago as an effort to address a problem: the lack of daily coverage, investigative stories and analysis of organized crime in the Americas. …

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – Ten Years of Investigating Organized Crime in the Americas

FEATURED / 2 NOV 2020

In early 2009, Steven Dudley was in Medellín, Colombia. His assignment: speak to a jailed paramilitary leader in the Itagui prison, just south of the city. Following his interview inside…