HomeNewsBriefDominican Republic Claims Drug Traffickers Turning to Haiti
BRIEF

Dominican Republic Claims Drug Traffickers Turning to Haiti

CARIBBEAN / 5 NOV 2015 BY ARRON DAUGHERTY EN

Officials in the Dominican Republic assert drug traffickers are now diverting shipments to neighboring Haiti, a suspicious claim that nonetheless highlights larger trends in Caribbean trafficking routes. 

Due to strengthened efforts by the Dominican Republic's National Drugs Control Agency (DNCD), drug traffickers are choosing to land drug shipments from South America in Haiti instead of the Dominican Republic, a DNCD press release stated. 

The agency cited recent seizures of "significant" amounts of drugs near the Haitian border as evidence of this trend. 

In response, the DNCD, in coordination with the Dominican Republic's military, is stepping up land, sea, and air patrols near Haitian waters and the nations' shared land border, the release added. 

InSight Crime Analysis

The DNCD's claims -- essentially congratulating itself on a job well done -- must be approached with skepticism. 

To be sure, it is highly plausible traffickers are choosing to land drug shipments in Haiti. A series of coups in recent decades have left Haiti's rule of law in tatters, and the nation ranks worst in the region (tied with Venezuela) on Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index.

Nonetheless, the Dominican Republic is also a well-established trafficking route, facilitated by deep-seated corruption. Allegations of ties to drug trafficking have even reached a former president. Additionally, the recent escape from the country of two French pilots convicted of drug trafficking casts doubt on the DNCD's claim of tightened security.

SEE ALSO: Coverage of the Dominican Republic

However, the DNCD report may also reflect a resurgence in Caribbean drug trafficking routes. Several Central American nations have installed radar and passed laws allowing suspected drugs flights to be shot down, putting pressure on trafficking corridors through the isthmus. In the case of Honduras, these efforts have been so effective authorities claim to have blocked nearly all drug flights in their airspace.

As such, traffickers may be reviving Caribbean routes to the US drug market (which were favored in the 1980s) or seeking to establish new ones, potentially leading to the increased use of Hispaniola in general as a key transshipment point. 

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

CARIBBEAN / 19 JUL 2012

A leading opposition politician in Puerto Rico has called for the imposition of a state of emergency, citing rising crime…

CARIBBEAN / 20 MAY 2019

A Venezuelan criminal gang has migrated to the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago -- sounding alarms about the expansion…

CARIBBEAN / 14 JAN 2015

An investigation conducted by a Florida newspaper revealed that numerous Cuban criminal networks operate in the United States, a phenomenon…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…

THE ORGANIZATION

Backing Investigative Journalism Around the Globe

5 NOV 2021

InSight Crime was a proud supporter of this year's Global Investigative Journalism Conference, which took place November 1 through November 5 and convened nearly 2,000 journalists…

THE ORGANIZATION

Tracking Dirty Money and Tren de Aragua

29 OCT 2021

InSight Crime was delighted to support investigative reporting in the Americas through a workshop with our friends at Connectas, a non-profit journalism initiative that facilitates collaboration…