HomeNoticiasBriefFake Turtle Eggs With GPS Trackers Seek Rollout Across Latin America
BRIEF

Fake Turtle Eggs With GPS Trackers Seek Rollout Across Latin America

COSTA RICA / 26 OCT 2020 BY ALEJANDRA RODRÍGUEZ EN

An experiment to track turtle egg poachers by planting synthetic eggs equipped with GPS trackers in Costa Rica has offered a seductive new approach to fighting wildlife trafficking, but now faces the challenge of scaling up.

Turtle egg decoys were placed in 101 nests in four locations around Costa Rica among other nests of green and olive ridley turtle eggs. Around 25 percent of them were stolen and tracked as they passed from egg hunters to traffickers and even to final consumers, according to an October report published in Current Biology magazine.

Early results suggested the eggs were not traveling far from the beaches. One of the decoy eggs was delivered to a nearby residential area, another was found at a bar just two kilometers away while the rest moved inland but no further than 130 kilometers.

SEE ALSO: Coronavirus Has Not Slowed Looting of Latin America’s Maritime Species

According to Sarah Otterstrom, executive director of Paso Pacífico, the non-governmental organization that developed the project, the final consumers of the turtle eggs were largely located in cities around Costa Rica. Interviews carried out by Paso Pacífico also revealed that some of the eggs were being sold door-to-door.

“The decoys, named InvestEGGator, were equipped with GPS trackers and SIM cards along with technology developed by a Chinese firm, ReachFar. The information sent from the eggs could be traced through cell towers,” Otterstrom told InSight Crime.

The inside of the InvestEGGator

“The biggest challenge was secretly setting the eggs in nests that were likely to get stolen by poachers. This is sometimes difficult to predict. A memorable moment was watching the movement of sea turtle nest eggs from the computer, and realizing they had moved from the coast to a market in San José, Costa Rica, and then onto a residential neighborhood,” Otterstrom told ZME Science in a separate interview.

“This documents the entire illegal market chain, and also pinpoints potential points of sale. Law enforcement and the government could use this tool in the future,” she added.

InSight Crime Analysis 

InvestEggators hidden among real eggs at a turtle nesting site

The trafficking of turtle eggs has become a real blight across the region, with tens of thousands of eggs being stolen in Mexico, Colombia, Panama and Costa Rica, among others, during the coronavirus pandemic.

It was no surprise that placing trackers inside fake turtle eggs, an idea allegedly inspired by the HBO television series “The Wire,” received so much international media coverage earlier this year.

But Paso Pacífico has been keen to manage expectations. The Costa Rica investigation did not lead to any arrests, for example, but this is just the first step, according to Otterstrom. At least one other unspecified Latin American country has been in touch about using the technology, she confirmed. Researchers are keen to deploy the InvestEGGators as part of broader alliances with environmental authorities that are able to take action based on the data collected.

SEE ALSO: Coverage of Environmental Crime

Certainly, efforts to crack down on turtle egg trafficking have been lackluster so far. While Mexico claims to protect millions of sea turtles laying eggs every year, arrests are not proving effective. “It is frustrating to see authorities do not go beyond arresting egg hunters, who often live in poverty and have few other options to make a living,” she told InSight Crime.

Paso Pacífico also faced problems in implementing its innovative solution, including difficulties with obtaining the permits needed to start their investigation. Costa Rica was ultimately the only country to grant them permission to do so.

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Related Content

BOLIVIA / 1 MAR 2018

A recent eco-trafficking bust in Bolivia involving Chinese nationals demonstrates how the ongoing trade in exotic animal parts is being fueled…

ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME / 30 OCT 2017

More than a dozen trailers transporting multi-ton shipments of frozen octopus have been reported stolen in Mexico in the…

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 15 SEP 2015

A new report says the majority of firearms trafficked into Mexico may not be manufactured in the United States, highlighting…

Institutional Content

THE ORGANIZATION

Strategic Communications Manager Job Description

12 FEB 2021

InSight Crime is looking for a full-time strategic communications manager. This person needs to be able to work in a fast-paced world of daily news, high-profile investigations, national and international…

THE ORGANIZATION

We Have Updated Our Website

4 FEB 2021

Welcome to our new home page. We have revamped the site to create a better display and reader experience.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Events – Border Crime: The Northern Triangle and Tri-Border Area

ARGENTINA / 25 JAN 2021

Through several rounds of extensive field investigations, our researchers have analyzed and mapped out the main illicit economies and criminal groups present in 39 border departments spread across the six countries of study – the Northern Triangle trio of Guatemala, Honduras, and El…

BRIEF

InSight Crime’s ‘Memo Fantasma’ Investigation Wins Simón Bolívar National Journalism Prize

COLOMBIA / 20 NOV 2020

The staff at InSight Crime was awarded the prestigious Simón Bolívar national journalism prize in Colombia for its two-year investigation into the drug trafficker known as “Memo Fantasma,” which was…

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – From Uncovering Organized Crime to Finding What Works

COLOMBIA / 12 NOV 2020

This project began 10 years ago as an effort to address a problem: the lack of daily coverage, investigative stories and analysis of organized crime in the Americas. …