HomeNewsBriefGuatemala to Tackle Femicide With New Task Force
BRIEF

Guatemala to Tackle Femicide With New Task Force

GENDER AND CRIME / 26 JAN 2012 BY EDWARD FOX EN

Guatemalan President Otto Perez announced the creation of a new task force to combat the country’s high rate of murders of women.

The new unit against "femicide" will be coordinated by former prosecutor Mirna Carrera, and will aim to reduce the number of femicides by 25 per cent this year, reported Univision.

In 2011, Guatemala saw roughly 700 women killed, making it the second most dangerous country in Latin America for women.

Authorities also announced the creation of a separate force to counter kidnappings in Guatemala. This brings the total number of special task forces to five since Perez was inaugurated on January 14, with others created to combat extortion, vehicle theft and “sicarios,” or assasins.

InSight Crime Analysis

Perez faces a huge battle in reducing Guatemala’s femicide rates. Since 2000 there have been 5,000 cases of femicide in the country. Guatemala passed a law in 2008 that formally recognizes femicide as a crime within its own right, covering both physical and psychological elements of abuse to women. However, this has done little to reduce impunity rates, with a reported 98 per cent of criminals in femicide cases walking free.

One problem the special task force may have to consider is the high rate of femicides which result from domestic violence, which frequently receives fewer attention and resources compared to other types of crimes. For example, a report by the Guatemala Human Rights Commission (GHRC) showed that between January and August 2008, 61 per cent of femicides were the end result of domestic violence.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

GUATEMALA / 8 DEC 2010

Guatemalan Congress approved a law Tuesday that allows the state to seize the assets and property linked to criminal activity.

GENDER AND CRIME / 10 JUN 2016

A joint operation involving authorities in Paraguay, Spain and France has broken up a multi-country sex trafficking network, illustrating some…

EL SALVADOR / 30 APR 2019

Widespread fear of street gangs in the Northern Triangle countries is being exploited by copycat groups who pose as gang…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.