HomeNewsBriefHead of Mexican Navy Calls For Less Militarized Approach to Crime
BRIEF

Head of Mexican Navy Calls For Less Militarized Approach to Crime

MEXICO / 5 SEP 2012 BY GEOFFREY RAMSEY EN

The head of Mexico’s Navy, which has traditionally been at the forefront of the government’s anti-drug trafficking strategy, has called on President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto to adopt a different policy in the fight againt organized crime.

In a September 3 press conference, Admiral Mariano Francisco Saynez, Secretary of Mexico’s Navy, said that he hoped the next government would make a number of adjustments to the current security strategy. in the country. In his remarks, Saynez called on Peña Nieto, who will be taking office on December 1, to prioritize intelligence work over military action.

Although he cautioned that the next government should not hesitate to continue to crack down on drug traffickers, he said that authorities should first go after those targets with the highest possibility of being found and brought to justice.

"That's what you should focus on and, of course, try to minimize violence, bring it down, perhaps even avoiding heavy reliance on the armed forces," said the admiral.

InSight Crime Analysis

The admiral's comments are particularly powerful, as the Mexican Navy has long held a reputation as the cleanest branch of service in the country. US officials share far more intelligence with their Mexican counterparts in the navy than with the army, and navy personnel and Marines are considered the most dependable operatives in drug operations throughout the country.

His remarks amounted to a criticism of the policies of both the current administration of President Felipe Calderon and the intended approach of Peña Nieto, who has announced that he will also rely heavily on the military -- at least in the short term -- during his presidency. While his criticism of Calderon will likely have few consequences as he has entered the lame duck stage of his presidency, the remarks aimed at Peña Nieto may have just ensured that Saynez will be replaced in December once the new president is sworn in.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

CONTRABAND / 25 NOV 2020

A flu vaccine in Mexico has become the latest drug to emerge on Latin America’s burgeoning black market medicine trade,…

BELTRAN LEYVA ORG / 13 JUN 2011

An elaborate cemetery in northwest Mexico, subject of a new documentary film, points to the ways drug lords continue to…

HOMICIDES / 8 APR 2013

Since taking office four months ago, Mexico's President Enrique Peña Nieto and his subordinates have been working overtime to forge…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…

THE ORGANIZATION

Backing Investigative Journalism Around the Globe

5 NOV 2021

InSight Crime was a proud supporter of this year's Global Investigative Journalism Conference, which took place November 1 through November 5 and convened nearly 2,000 journalists…

THE ORGANIZATION

Tracking Dirty Money and Tren de Aragua

29 OCT 2021

InSight Crime was delighted to support investigative reporting in the Americas through a workshop with our friends at Connectas, a non-profit journalism initiative that facilitates collaboration…