HomeNewsBriefMexican Federal Cops Quitting Nearly as Fast as They Join
BRIEF

Mexican Federal Cops Quitting Nearly as Fast as They Join

MEXICO / 10 OCT 2011 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

The number of Federal Police in Mexico who quit the force tripled in a two-year period, according to the national freedom of information agency.

Data from Mexico's Federal Institute for Access to Public Information (IFAI) says that in the past four years, eight out of every 10 federal police officers left the force. Reasons range from retirement to injury to death. However, the largest number of inactive officers voluntarily resigned.

El Universal reports that out of the 8,327 officers who passed their entrance exams between 2007 and 2010, over 6,000 of them have since become inactive. A little over 400 were killed, while 5,890 quit. The number of officers who quit between 2007 and 2009 tripled, rising from 662 to 2,170.

The data also appears to indicate that while more police are quitting, more are signing up and are passing the entrance exams. Just 591 trainees were approved to join the police force in 2007, compared with 3,899 in 2009 and 2,169 in 2010. The average monthly pay for a federal officer is 12,000 pesos (about $900), significantly higher than salaries earned by municipal cops, who, depending on the state, may earn as little as $300 a month.

Mexico has relied on its federal force to fill the gap left by municipal police, who suffer from high levels of corruption. The wide variation in training, equipment and pay found within the municipal force is one reason why the government has proposed to unify over 2,000 local departments with a new federal standard.

There are currently about 35,000 members of Mexico's Federal Police force.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 24 MAR 2022

The 2021 ranking of the world's most violent cities predictably features a heavy presence by Latin American and Caribbean population…

CHINA AND CRIME / 29 SEP 2021

Mexican geoduck clam populations are suffering as legal harvests are threatened by rampant poaching, which has driven the species onto…

FENTANYL / 22 NOV 2022

Authorities in the United States have sanctioned a Mexican criminal group for trafficking illicit fentanyl into the country.

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Escaping Barrio 18

27 JAN 2023

Last week, InSight Crime published an investigation charting the story of Desafío, a 28-year-old Barrio 18 gang member who is desperate to escape gang life. But there’s one problem: he’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

Europe Coverage Makes a Splash

20 JAN 2023

Last week, InSight Crime published an analysis of the role of Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport as an arrival hub for cocaine and methamphetamine from Mexico.  The article was picked up by…

THE ORGANIZATION

World Looks to InSight Crime for Mexico Expertise

13 JAN 2023

Our coverage of the arrest of Chapitos’ co-founder Ovidio Guzmán López in Mexico has received worldwide attention.In the UK, outlets including The Independent and BBC…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Shares Expertise with US State Department

16 DEC 2022

Last week, InSight Crime Co-founder Steven Dudley took part in the International Anti-Corruption Conference organized by the US State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, & Labor and…

THE ORGANIZATION

Immediate Response to US-Mexico Marijuana Investigation

9 DEC 2022

InSight Crime’s investigation into how the legalization of marijuana in many US states has changed Mexico’s criminal dynamics made a splash this week appearing on the front page of…