HomeNewsBriefMexico Cocaine Seizures Halved Under Calderon: Congress
BRIEF

Mexico Cocaine Seizures Halved Under Calderon: Congress

MEXICO / 18 MAR 2013 BY ELYSSA PACHICO EN

A decline in cocaine seizures since 2006 is evidence of Mexico's decreased importance as a transit country for drug shipments, as more cocaine is now being moved through Central America, according to a report by the country's Congress.

The Chamber of Deputies briefing (available for download below) notes that cocaine seizures declined during President Felipe Calderon's six-year term, with 21.3 tons confiscated in 2006, compared with the 11.3 tons seized in 2011, a year before Calderon left office.

Marijuana seizures, in contrast, did not decline significantly under Calderon, with 1,902 tons reported seized in 2006, and 1,799 tons seized in 2011. The numbers are based on records kept by the presidency.

The report goes on to assert that Mexico's declining cocaine seizures are partly down due to more drug shipments being moved through Central American nations like El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. Drug seizures in Central America are currently 13 times higher than those registered in Mexico, the report states, although it does not provide a source for the statistic.

The report, which is dated October 2012 but appears to have been released recently, is an assessment of the accomplishments of Mexico's Attorney General's Office (PGR) under Calderon.

InSight Crime Analysis

The Chamber of Deputies briefing is correct to point out that the amount of cocaine trafficked through Central America has increased significantly since 2006. The US State Department reports that Honduras seized around 22 tons of cocaine in 2012 compared to 8.1 tons in 2006, an increase of around 170 per cent. El Salvador and Guatemala saw even greater increases in cocaine seizures during this time period, according to US figures. Cocaine seizures in El Salvador grew 227 per cent between 2006 and 2012, while Guatemala saw an increase of over 1,000 percent. There has also been evidence of an increase of trafficking through the Caribbean.

However, it is unclear whether the significantly higher amounts of cocaine moved through Central America would fully explain the decline in seizures in Mexico. It is possible that the Mexican authorities are simply seizing a lower percentage of the cocaine being moved through the country.

Another factor in declining seizures could be that traffickers are changing their Mexican smuggling routes from maritime to overland.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

BRAZIL / 2 NOV 2021

Organized crime groups in Latin America continue to expand into illicit synthetic drug production, including mass manufacturing of methamphetamine and…

EL MENCHO / 25 MAY 2022

The CJNG’s reign as Mexico’s most dominant and ruthless cartel may be showing some signs of wear.

FEATURED / 22 OCT 2020

Despite having long played down the presence of the powerful Jalisco Cartel in Mexico City, a series of recent moves…

About InSight Crime

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Extensive Coverage of our Chronicles of a Cartel Bodyguard

23 SEP 2022

Our recent investigation, A Cartel Bodyguard in Mexico’s 'Hot Land', has received extensive media coverage.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime, American University Host Illegal Fishing Panel

19 SEP 2022

InSight Crime and the Center for Latin American & Latino Studies (CLALS) at American University discussed the findings of a joint investigation on IUU fishing at a September 9 conference.

THE ORGANIZATION

Impact on the Media Landscape

9 SEP 2022

InSight Crime’s first investigation on the Dominican Republic made an immediate impact on the Dominican media landscape, with major news outlets republishing and reprinting our findings, including in …

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Sharpens Its Skills

2 SEP 2022

Last week, the InSight Crime team gathered for our annual retreat in Colombia, where we discussed our vision and strategy for the next 12 months.  During the week, we also learned how to…

THE ORGANIZATION

Colombia’s Fragile Path to Peace Begins to Take Shape

26 AUG 2022

InSight Crime is charting the progress of President Gustavo Petro’s agenda as he looks to revolutionize Colombia’s security policy, opening dialogue with guerrillas, reforming the military and police, and…