HomeNewsBriefMexico Govt Accused of Hiding Evidence in Iguala Case
BRIEF

Mexico Govt Accused of Hiding Evidence in Iguala Case

AYOTZINAPA / 18 AUG 2015 BY MICHAEL LOHMULLER EN

A commission conducting an investigation into the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has denounced the government for withholding evidence, accusations sure to fuel more distrust in a government already on its heels.

In a press conference on August 17, the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (known by its Spanish acronym GIEI) -- part of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights -- announced that during its investigations into the September 2014 disappearance of 43 student teachers in Iguala, Mexico, it found the Mexican government hid pertinent evidence.

According to the GIEI, Mexico’s Attorney General's Office withheld evidence found on two buses the students were riding the night they disappeared, including clothes belonging to the students. Additionally, the GIEI found that video footage of police detaining the students was possibly destroyed.

The GIEI also stated petitions to the government to interview 26 soldiers from the 27th Infantry Battalion -- who allegedly witnessed events in the case of the students’ disappearance -- have been repeatedly delayed. And while permission was granted on August 16, interviews can only be conducted via written questionnaires.

Members of the GIEI said they hope to extend their six-month investigation period -- which ends September 2 -- but will release a written report of their findings to date on September 6.

InSight Crime Analysis

The GIEI's press conference -- the first since it was formed -- is not a good sign for the Mexican government or the GIEI. Airing its grievances in public shows the group does not expect to get much more official cooperation.

The statements will also surely contribute to the crisis of confidence in the government of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, which has been devastated this past year by scandal and security setbacks, including the escape of famed drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman from a maximum security prison.

SEE ALSO: Mexico News and Profiles

Beginning almost immediately following the students’ disappearance, doubts have circulated surrounding the official version of events, which holds the students were abducted by police and handed over to a criminal group known as the Guerreros Unidos, who then murdered them and burned their bodies.

Despite attempts by the government to show transparency in its investigations, public skepticism abounds, with many perceiving the government as attempting to sidestep the case and cover-up involvement of local officials and security forces.

The GIEI shows no signs of adhering to the Mexican government's line, something that may make its job of unearthing the truth even more difficult.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

COLOMBIA / 29 OCT 2021

The fascination with “narco-culture” has taken over the entertainment and media industries: documentaries, TV shows, movies, podcasts, even a dedicated…

MEXICO / 21 JAN 2021

Former President Donald Trump's border wall project has developed a spotty record of attracting organized crime to its many construction…

CHINA AND CRIME / 9 DEC 2022

The rise of synthetic drugs, in particular fentanyl and methamphetamine, have changed the landscape of opportunity for drug traffickers in…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

‘Ndrangheta Investigation, Exclusive Interview With Suriname President Make Waves

2 DEC 2022

Two weeks ago, InSight Crime published an investigation into how Italian mafia clan the ‘Ndrangheta built a cocaine trafficking network from South America to ‘Ndrangheta-controlled Italian ports. The investigation generated…

WORK WITH US

Open Position: Full Stack WordPress Developer

28 NOV 2022

As Full Stack WordPress Developer You Will: Work collaboratively with other developers and designers to maintain and improve organizational standards.Demonstrate a high level of attention to detail, and implement best…

THE ORGANIZATION

Join Us This #GivingTuesday in Exposing Organized Crime

24 NOV 2022

For over twelve years, InSight Crime has contributed to the global dialogue on organized crime and corruption. Our work has provided policymakers, analysts, academics, journalists, and the general public with…

THE ORGANIZATION

Like Crime, Our Coverage Knows No Borders

18 NOV 2022

The nature of global organized crime means that while InSight Crime focuses on Latin America, we also follow criminal dynamics worldwide. InSight Crime investigator Alessandro Ford covers the connections between Latin American and European…

THE ORGANIZATION

Using Data to Expose Crime

11 NOV 2022

Co-director Jeremy McDermott made a virtual presentation at a conference hosted by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). The ‘Sixth International Conference on Governance, Crime, and Justice…