HomeNewsBriefMexico's Kidnapping Cases Rise Dramatically in 2012: NGO
BRIEF

Mexico's Kidnapping Cases Rise Dramatically in 2012: NGO

KIDNAPPING / 21 DEC 2012 BY EDWARD FOX EN

Mexico may have seen an average of 72 kidnappings per day throughout 2012, according to an NGO, a huge number which bears no relation to official statistics and which would make the country one of the kidnap capitals of the world.

Speaking to EFE news agency, the director of the NGO Council for Law and Human Rights (Consejo para la Ley y los Derechos Humanos - CLDH) stated, “by this date last year we had an average of 51 (kidnapping) cases per day. This year, with December’s figures, we have 72 cases per day.”

The figure does not include “express” kidnappings where victims are detained for a matter of hours, usually for a ransom payment.

The director, Fernando Ruiz, added that despite the government’s framing of kidnapping as being the work of drug gangs, there are an alarming amount of cases that involve the police and military; the CLDH estimates that some 70-80 percent of cases could involve officials, while only one in 10 cases actually reported. No proof was offered to substantiate these claims.

“The big problem we have in Mexico in terms of security is precisely the bodies that should provide security to citizens,” Ruiz said.

According to the CLDH head, the areas that saw the most kidnappings were the states of Morelos, Puebla, Mexico state, and Jalisco, areas that don’t have a strong drug cartel presence.

InSight Crime Analysis

If Mexico finishes the year with an average of 72 kidnap cases per day, then it will mark a 46 percent jump on the final figure released by the CLDH for 2011 of 49 per day. That is 16,562 cases more than the 2011 total given by the federal police. 

Little information has been provided on the methodology used by the CLDH. What's more, if their figures are close to being true, it would mark an alarming rate when considering that Colombia -- formerly considered the kidnap capital of the world -- had a rate of 8 reported cases per day when kidnapping was at its peak in 2002.

The Federal Police put the number of kidnappings at 1,093 from January to September this year, equating to roughly 4.5 cases per day, reported El Universal. The federal force warned earlier this year that drug gangs such as the Zetas and Gulf Cartel were growing increasingly reliant on kidnapping as a source of revenue.

Mexico now has one of the worst tallies for kidnapping in the region, even according to officials figures. Venezuela, increasingly notorious for kidnapping, saw 1,105 cases in 2011, based on official figures, slightly less than the Mexican police's figure of 1,323 for last year, although with a smaller population. Like Mexico, this ignores express kidnappings, a figure which could reach 20-40 cases a day in the Venezuelan capital of Caracas alone.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

MEXICO / 25 MAR 2016

The United States sentenced a Mexico businessman for laundering millions of dollars in drug proceeds for the Zetas criminal organization,…

EL CHAPO / 8 APR 2019

The arrest of Juan Guadalupe Jacobo Regalado, alias "El J3" or "El Chepa," in early April marks a significant blow…

MEXICO / 28 JUL 2011

As Mexican authorities investigate the murder of 17 inmates in a Juarez jail, video footage from…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.

THE ORGANIZATION

Series on Environmental Crime in the Amazon Generates Headlines

17 SEP 2021

InSight Crime and the Igarapé Institute have been delighted at the response to our joint investigation into environmental crimes in the Colombian Amazon. Coverage of our chapters dedicated to illegal mining…