HomeNewsBriefMissing Mexican Band Members Found Dead on 'Traffickers' Ranch'
BRIEF

Missing Mexican Band Members Found Dead on 'Traffickers' Ranch'

MEXICO / 29 JAN 2013 BY MARGUERITE CAWLEY EN

Several members of a band who had been missing since January 25 were found dead in the north Mexican state of Nuevo Leon, in a ranch allegedly belonging to drug traffickers.

Between 18 and 20 members of Kombo Kolombia, a band playing Colombian-style music, went missing after performing at a private party in the town of Hidalgo. A band member who escaped told authorities that some 10 gunmen had interrupted the party, forced the band into a van, and driven them out of town. He heard the men question his bandmates about if they were in a drug cartel, then gunshots, as the Associated Press reported.

The state Attorney General’s Office reported that 14 bodies have been found in a pit on a ranch in the town of Minas, 30 kilometers from where the party was held, and that they had gunshot wounds and signs of torture, reported El Diario. Authorities are continuing the search for more bodies.

Police said that they thought the band was contracted for the party as a trap. Official sources told El Diario that Kombo Kolombia had performed in bars linked to the Zetas gang.

InSight Crime Analysis

This would not be the first time that Mexican musicians have been caught up in drug violence. In one high-publicized case, popular singer Diego Rivas was gunned down in Sinaloa state in 2011. He was well-known for singing “narcocorrido” songs, a genre which celebrates drug trafficking, and there have been a number of other cases of narcocorrido singers being killed after apparently falling foul of their subjects.

Kombo Kolombia, however, did not play narcocorrido songs, but vallenato, a genre of romantic Colombian music, and cumbia, an upbeat musical style from Colombia's coast. 

Nuevo Leon, close to the Texas border, is home to high levels of drug-related violence. Its capital, Monterrey, is currently the battleground in a bloody battle between the Zetas and the Gulf Cartel, and has recently seen violence spurred by internal splits in the Zetas.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Tags

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

EL MENCHO / 2 SEP 2021

As violence has continued to rise in Mexico year after year, criminal groups have adopted an increasingly militarized approach to…

BRAZIL / 2 NOV 2021

Organized crime groups in Latin America continue to expand into illicit synthetic drug production, including mass manufacturing of methamphetamine and…

MEXICO / 16 APR 2021

After the discovery of several elaborate tunnels used to siphon fuel to two hidden warehouses, it's clear that Mexico's gas…

About InSight Crime

LA ORGANIZACIÓN

Extensive Coverage of our Chronicles of a Cartel Bodyguard

23 SEP 2022

Our recent investigation, A Cartel Bodyguard in Mexico’s 'Hot Land', has received extensive media coverage.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime, American University Host Illegal Fishing Panel

19 SEP 2022

InSight Crime and the Center for Latin American & Latino Studies (CLALS) at American University discussed the findings of a joint investigation on IUU fishing at a September 9 conference.

THE ORGANIZATION

Impact on the Media Landscape

9 SEP 2022

InSight Crime’s first investigation on the Dominican Republic made an immediate impact on the Dominican media landscape, with major news outlets republishing and reprinting our findings, including in …

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Sharpens Its Skills

2 SEP 2022

Last week, the InSight Crime team gathered for our annual retreat in Colombia, where we discussed our vision and strategy for the next 12 months.  During the week, we also learned how to…

THE ORGANIZATION

Colombia’s Fragile Path to Peace Begins to Take Shape

26 AUG 2022

InSight Crime is charting the progress of President Gustavo Petro’s agenda as he looks to revolutionize Colombia’s security policy, opening dialogue with guerrillas, reforming the military and police, and…