HomeNewsBriefPeru Govt Seeks to Block Shining Path Party from Politics
BRIEF

Peru Govt Seeks to Block Shining Path Party from Politics

PERU / 19 JAN 2012 BY CHRISTOPHER LOOFT EN

Weeks after the Shining Path guerrilla organization called for peace talks with the government, the justice minister has declared that those promoting terrorist groups will not be allowed to enter politics.

This announcement comes as the Movement for Amnesty and Fundamental Rights (known by its Spanish acronym Movadef) files for political party status. The organization is linked to the Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso) guerrilla group.

Justice Minister Juan Jimenez urged that the panel not approve the group’s application, reports La Republica, declaring, “We will not permit political organizations which correspond to armed groups that … have not shown remorse with respect to the wrongdoings and crimes they have committed, to enter politics and destroy it.”

InSight Crime Analysis

In December, one of the remaining factions of the Shining Path publicly offered to begin peace talks with the government. The government has not accepted the proposal, and the guerrilla leader said that the authorities had rejected two previous attempts to make contact.

This move to prevent Movadef from becoming a legal political party indicates that the government is unlikely to offer political concessions to the Shining Path in order to demobilize the group.

In neighboring Colombia, in contrast, President Juan Manuel Santos has been trying to push through legislation to allow demobilized members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) to take part in politics. An attempt in the 1980s to bring the rebels into the political system by launching a FARC-linked political party, however, ended in the murder of thousands of members, and the dissolution of the party.

Compartir icon icon icon

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Related Content

HUMAN TRAFFICKING / 26 SEP 2014

Peru has announced plans to hire four special prosecutors to investigate cases of human trafficking, a crime concentrated in regions…

EXTORTION / 16 JUN 2017

Extortion mafias in north Peru have regrouped and restructured after operations to dismantle them late last year, illustrating a pattern…

PERU / 16 NOV 2011

Peru's police captured two suspected members of the Shining Path guerrilla group in separate operations carried out in Lima and…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

We Have Updated Our Website

4 FEB 2021

Welcome to our new home page. We have revamped the site to create a better display and reader experience.

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Events – Border Crime: The Northern Triangle and Tri-Border Area

ARGENTINA / 25 JAN 2021

Through several rounds of extensive field investigations, our researchers have analyzed and mapped out the main illicit economies and criminal groups present in 39 border departments spread across the six countries of study – the Northern Triangle trio of Guatemala, Honduras, and El…

BRIEF

InSight Crime’s ‘Memo Fantasma’ Investigation Wins Simón Bolívar National Journalism Prize

COLOMBIA / 20 NOV 2020

The staff at InSight Crime was awarded the prestigious Simón Bolívar national journalism prize in Colombia for its two-year investigation into the drug trafficker known as “Memo Fantasma,” which was…

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – From Uncovering Organized Crime to Finding What Works

COLOMBIA / 12 NOV 2020

This project began 10 years ago as an effort to address a problem: the lack of daily coverage, investigative stories and analysis of organized crime in the Americas. …

ANALYSIS

InSight Crime – Ten Years of Investigating Organized Crime in the Americas

FEATURED / 2 NOV 2020

In early 2009, Steven Dudley was in Medellín, Colombia. His assignment: speak to a jailed paramilitary leader in the Itagui prison, just south of the city. Following his interview inside…