HomeNewsBriefPeru Arrests Reveal Shining Path's Links to the Drug Trade
BRIEF

Peru Arrests Reveal Shining Path's Links to the Drug Trade

PERU / 2 OCT 2013 BY CHARLES PARKINSON EN

Drug traffickers arrested in Peru have cast light on how the Shining Path profits from the drug trade, highlighting the difference between the Peruvian guerrilla group and other Latin American rebels involved in trafficking, such as Colombia's FARC.

Following a joint operation by the country's army and police, authorities reported 23 arrests and the dismantling of a drug trafficking network connected to the guerrilla insurgency, reported El Comercio. The arrests took place in the Valley of the Apurimac, Ene and Mantaro rivers (VRAEM), Peru's principal coca growing region and the Shining Path's last stronghold.

According to La Republica, testimony from three of the network's leaders has highlighted the dynamic between drug traffickers and the guerrillas, who apparently have no direct role in the harvesting or processing of drugs, but tax and regulate those who do.

The arrested traffickers told officials the Shining Path collected a levy of $5,000 for every ton of product moved through their territory, as well as demanding weapons and equipment.

SEE ALSO: Shining Path Profile

InSight Crime Analysis

This insight into the Shining Path's operations in the VRAEM demonstrates how they differ markedly from other rebel groups such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), which are directly involved in cocaine processing and transportation. Like the Shining Path, the FARC also impose taxes, but charge far more than the Peruvian guerrillas. While Shining Path taxes amount to $5 per kilo, the FARC are thought to charge fifty times that by taxing farmers and buyers per kilo of coca base.

The results are reflected in the groups' earnings. With the VRAEM estimated to produce around 150 tons of cocaine a year, according to La Republica, the Shining Path would then earn less than $1 million annually, while InSight Crime estimates place annual FARC earnings from drug trafficking at approximately $200 million a year.

SEE ALSO: The FARC, Peace, and Possible Criminalization

However the Shining Path have other sources of income, including taxing illegal logging and mining and extorting businesses and corporations. The confiscation in April 2012 of $100 million of property owned by Shining Path leaders demonstrated the group has access to significant funds.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

PERU / 12 JUL 2013

Violence in Peru has been relatively low since the end of its civil conflict in the late 1990s. Although it…

AUC / 30 AUG 2021

Pablo Emilio Escobar Gaviria was the pioneer in industrial-scale cocaine trafficking.

ELITES AND CRIME / 4 DEC 2014

Authorities in Peru have seized 17 estates reportedly worth more than $1 billion from Rodolfo Orellana, the incarcerated leader of…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Guatemala Social Insecurity Investigation Makes Front Page News

10 DEC 2021

InSight Crime’s latest investigation into a case of corruption within Guatemala's social security agency linked to the deaths of patients with kidney disease made waves in…

THE ORGANIZATION

Venezuela El Dorado Investigation Makes Headlines

3 DEC 2021

InSight Crime's investigation into the trafficking of illegal gold in Venezuela's Amazon region generated impact on both social media and in the press. Besides being republished and mentioned by several…

THE ORGANIZATION

Gender and Investigative Techniques Focus of Workshops

26 NOV 2021

On November 23-24, InSight Crime conducted a workshop called “How to Cover Organized Crime: Investigation Techniques and A Focus on Gender.” The session convened reporters and investigators from a dozen…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Names Two New Board Members

19 NOV 2021

In recent weeks, InSight Crime added two new members to its board. Joy Olson is the former executive director of the Washington Office on Latin America…

THE ORGANIZATION

Senate Commission in Paraguay Cites InSight Crime

12 NOV 2021

InSight Crime’s reporting and investigations often reach the desks of diplomats, security officials and politicians. The latest example occurred in late October during a commission of Paraguay's Senate that tackled…