HomeNewsBrief'Shining Path' Attack Leaves 5 Soldiers Dead
BRIEF

'Shining Path' Attack Leaves 5 Soldiers Dead

PERU / 31 AUG 2012 BY EDWARD FOX EN

Five Peruvian soldiers were killed in an attack reportedly carried out by the VRAE-based faction of Peru's Shining Path guerrilla group, evidence that, despite the continued state of emergency in the area, the government is still far from eliminating the rebels from their last remaining stronghold.

Alleged Shining Path guerrillas launched an attack Aug. 15 on a military base in Mazangaro, Junin region, killing five Peruvian soldiers and injuring seven others, reported the AFP.

Mazangaro lies in Peru's lawless Apurimac and Ene River Valley (VRAE) where a state of emergency has been in place since May 2003. The region is home to the Shining Path's last remaining faction of some 500 fighters, led by Victor Quispe Palomino, alias "Comrade Jose."

According to La Republica, the attack could be in repsonse to the army's seizure three days prior to the assault of 800 kilos of precursor chemicals used in the production of cocaine.

InSight Crime Analysis

Despite dismantling the Shining Path's Huallaga-based faction in northern Peru earlier this year, the government has had no such success in the VRAE where the rebels continue to operate with relative ease. In addition to this latest attack, the group has been able to embarrass the government on a number of occasions this year, kidnapping 36 gas workers in April and subsequently ambushing, and killing security patrols sent to rescue the hostages. One of the faction's leaders even gave a surprise interview to journalists in the rebel stronghold, appearing unfazed by the government's military offensive against the group.

The VRAE is by no means home to only the Shining Path, however. Much of the cocaine trade in the VRAE is divided amongst Peru's cocaine clans, as a recent series by IDL-Reporteros outlined. These clans operate in conjunction with the Shining Path, according to the report, with the rebels acting as guards for drug shipments as well as controlling their own trafficking networks. If the attack was a reprisal for the army's seizure of precursors chemicals, the Shining Path may have acted on behalf of others and not necessarily on its own.

share icon icon icon

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

What are your thoughts? Click here to send InSight Crime your comments.

We encourage readers to copy and distribute our work for non-commercial purposes, with attribution to InSight Crime in the byline and links to the original at both the top and bottom of the article. Check the Creative Commons website for more details of how to share our work, and please send us an email if you use an article.

Was this content helpful?

We want to sustain Latin America’s largest organized crime database, but in order to do so, we need resources.

DONATE

Related Content

ARMS TRAFFICKING / 3 APR 2014

Authorities in Peru say the majority of arms used by criminal groups are stolen from private owners and…

DRUG POLICY / 27 DEC 2017

Between 2012 and 2017, less than 11 percent of Peru’s $650 million anti-narcotic expenditure was received by the Dirandro, Peru’s…

PERU / 28 FEB 2013

The Peruvian government has announced plans to ban the entry of foreigners with a criminal record as part of efforts…

About InSight Crime

THE ORGANIZATION

Apure Investigation Makes Headlines

22 OCT 2021

InSight Crime’s investigation into the battle for the Venezuelan border state of Apure resonated in both Colombian and Venezuelan media. A dozen outlets picked up the report, including Venezuela’s…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Tackles Illegal Fishing

15 OCT 2021

In October, InSight Crime and American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS) began a year-long project on illegal, unreported, unregulated (IUU) fishing in…

THE ORGANIZATION

InSight Crime Featured in Handbook for Reporting on Organized Crime

8 OCT 2021

In late September, the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) published an excerpt of its forthcoming guide on reporting organized crime in Indonesia.

THE ORGANIZATION

Probing Organized Crime in Haiti

1 OCT 2021

InSight Crime has made it a priority to investigate organized crime in Haiti, where an impotent state is reeling after the July assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, coupled with an…

THE ORGANIZATION

Emergency First Aid in Hostile Environments

24 SEP 2021

At InSight Crime's annual treat, we ramped up hostile environment and emergency first aid training for our 40-member staff, many of whom conduct on-the-ground investigations in dangerous corners of the region.